Disability concentration and access to rehabilitation services: a pilot spatial assessment applying geographic information system analysis

Gao, Fengsong, Foster, Michele and Liu, Yan (2018) Disability concentration and access to rehabilitation services: a pilot spatial assessment applying geographic information system analysis. Disability and Rehabilitation, 1-9. doi:10.1080/09638288.2018.1468931


Author Gao, Fengsong
Foster, Michele
Liu, Yan
Title Disability concentration and access to rehabilitation services: a pilot spatial assessment applying geographic information system analysis
Journal name Disability and Rehabilitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0963-8288
1464-5165
Publication date 2018-05-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/09638288.2018.1468931
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Subject 2742 Rehabilitation
Abstract Due to geographical disparities, many people with profound or severe disabilities experience considerable delays in rehabilitation treatment, resulting in threats to quality of life. This pilot study aims to identify areas in Greater Brisbane, Australia, with a higher concentration of people with profound or severe disabilities and to evaluate access to rehabilitation services in these areas.

Data came from the 2016 Australian Census of Population and Housing and the National Health Services Directory. Four frequently used rehabilitation services by individuals with profound or severe disabilities (i.e., occupational therapy, physiotherapy, speech pathology and psychology) were the focus of the analysis. The data were analyzed using geospatial analysis methods (e.g., spatial scan statistic and network analysis).

A higher concentration of rehabilitation services was found in the regions with lower disability prevalence and lower potential demand for rehabilitation services. In contrast, the regions with higher disability prevalence and higher potential demand for rehabilitation services experienced poorer access to rehabilitation services.

The findings are expected to inform policy decisions about the prioritization of rehabilitation resources and derive evidence for planning more responsive service delivery. Implications for rehabilitation The current study has demonstrated the utilization of geographic information system methods to facilitate rehabilitation service planning. Identification of disability concentration may inform locally responsive rehabilitation service delivery. Spatial assessment of mismatch between supply and potential demand may assist policy makers and service providers in the prioritization of rehabilitation resources. The current study contributes to the World Health Organization's call for action to ensure adequate access to rehabilitation services by people with profound or severe disabilities.
Formatted abstract
Purpose: Due to geographical disparities, many people with profound or severe disabilities experience considerable delays in rehabilitation treatment, resulting in threats to quality of life. This pilot study aims to identify areas in Greater Brisbane, Australia, with a higher concentration of people with profound or severe disabilities and to evaluate access to rehabilitation services in these areas.

Methods: Data came from the 2016 Australian Census of Population and Housing and the National Health Services Directory. Four frequently used rehabilitation services by individuals with profound or severe disabilities (i.e., occupational therapy, physiotherapy, speech pathology and psychology) were the focus of the analysis. The data were analyzed using geospatial analysis methods (e.g., spatial scan statistic and network analysis).

Results: A higher concentration of rehabilitation services was found in the regions with lower disability prevalence and lower potential demand for rehabilitation services. In contrast, the regions with higher disability prevalence and higher potential demand for rehabilitation services experienced poorer access to rehabilitation services.

Conclusion: The findings are expected to inform policy decisions about the prioritization of rehabilitation resources and derive evidence for planning more responsive service delivery.

Implications for rehabilitation:
• The current study has demonstrated the utilization of geographic information system methods to facilitate rehabilitation service planning.
• Identification of disability concentration may inform locally responsive rehabilitation service delivery.
• Spatial assessment of mismatch between supply and potential demand may assist policy makers and service providers in the prioritization of rehabilitation resources.
•The current study contributes to the World Health Organization’s call for action to ensure adequate access to rehabilitation services by people with profound or severe disabilities.
Keyword Disability concentration
Access to rehabilitation services
Geographic information system
Rehabilitation service planning
Service demand
Service supply
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sat, 05 May 2018, 09:46:54 EST by Dr Yan Liu on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)