Automated Analysis of the Auditory Brainstem Response

Bradley, A. P. and Wilson, W. J. (2004). Automated Analysis of the Auditory Brainstem Response. In: M. Palaniswami, Proceedings of the 2004 Intelligent Sensors, Sensor Networks and Information Processing Conference. International Conference on Intelligent Sensors, Sensor Networks and Information Processing (ISSNIP'04), Melbourne, Australia, (541-545). 14-17 December, 2004.

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Author Bradley, A. P.
Wilson, W. J.
Title of paper Automated Analysis of the Auditory Brainstem Response
Conference name International Conference on Intelligent Sensors, Sensor Networks and Information Processing (ISSNIP'04)
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 14-17 December, 2004
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 2004 Intelligent Sensors, Sensor Networks and Information Processing Conference
Journal name Proceedings of the 2004 Intelligent Sensors, Sensor Networks
Place of Publication Los Alamitos, California
Publisher IEEE
Publication Year 2004
Year available 2004
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
ISBN 0-7803-8894-1
Editor M. Palaniswami
Volume 1
Start page 541
End page 545
Total pages 5
Language eng
Abstract/Summary In this paper we describe an algorithm for automated peak-trough labelling of the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The algorithm finds the peaks of clinical interest by estimating the first and second derivatives of the ABR waveform. Prior knowledge regarding the expected latencies and amplitudes of the various peaks is then used to incrementally label peaks I through to VII. The performance of the algorithm is estimated on a set of 240 ABR waveforms captured at a stimulus intensity of 90dBnHL. The proposed algorithm not only offers insight into the manual process of ABR peak detection, but is shown to be extremely accurate (96-98%) at finding the primary peaks of clinical interest (I, III, and V). It is also shown that although peak IV can only be found with moderate accuracy (77%), almost one third of these correct detections come as a direct result of locating the 'peak' using the second derivative.
Subjects 280204 Signal Processing
291501 Clinical Engineering
E1
730111 Hearing, vision, speech and their disorders
Keyword auditory brainstem response
algorithm
labelling
automation
peaks
troughs
detection
Q-Index Code E1
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 22 Nov 2005, 10:00:00 EST by Andrew Bradley on behalf of School of Information Technol and Elec Engineering