The Micro Processes of Citizen Jury Deliberation: Implications for Deliberative Democracy

van Kasteren, Yasmin and McKenna, Bernard (2006). The Micro Processes of Citizen Jury Deliberation: Implications for Deliberative Democracy. In: Proceedings of the 56th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association. 56th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association, Dresden, Germany, (1-32). 19-23 June, 2006.

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Author van Kasteren, Yasmin
McKenna, Bernard
Title of paper The Micro Processes of Citizen Jury Deliberation: Implications for Deliberative Democracy
Conference name 56th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association
Conference location Dresden, Germany
Conference dates 19-23 June, 2006
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 56th Annual Conference of the International Communication Association
Publication Year 2006
Sub-type Fully published paper
Start page 1
End page 32
Total pages 33
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Despite the growing popularity of the citizen jury and other deliberative democratic approaches to public participation, there is no agreement on the method for evaluating them, nor even agreement on where evaluation should be applied, inputs, outputs or process. To evaluate its efficacy, this study convened a citizen jury to deliberate on waste management issues in a provincial Australian city. After considering the theory of deliberative democracy, the paper identifies six criteria and applies relevant analytical methods. The primary form of analysis is a sample of transcripts of jury deliberations used to examine the micro processes of the deliberative processes. This was supplemented by pre- and post-jury surveys as well as participant observation. The outcomes reveal that the micro-processes of jury deliberation were often characterised by unequal forms of interaction, poor focus on outcomes, and limited use of available knowledge. Nonetheless, the paper argues that deliberative processes do have a role to play in contemporary democracies.
Subjects 360102 Comparative Government and Politics
050299 Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
EX
Keyword citizen juries
deliberative democracy
evaluation
public participation
public policy
Q-Index Code EX

 
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Created: Mon, 10 Apr 2006, 10:00:00 EST