Fighting fit: thermal plasticity of metabolic function and fighting success in the crayfish Cherax destructor

Seebacher, F. and Wilson, R. S. (2006) Fighting fit: thermal plasticity of metabolic function and fighting success in the crayfish Cherax destructor. Functional Ecology, 20 6: 1045-1053. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2435.2006.01194.x


Author Seebacher, F.
Wilson, R. S.
Title Fighting fit: thermal plasticity of metabolic function and fighting success in the crayfish Cherax destructor
Journal name Functional Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0269-8463
1365-2435
Publication date 2006-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2435.2006.01194.x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 20
Issue 6
Start page 1045
End page 1053
Total pages 9
Place of publication Oxford
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject 270599 Zoology not elsewhere classified
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract 1. We examined the effect of thermal acclimation on fighting success and underlying performance traits in the crayfish Cherax destructor. We tested the hypothesis that animals will be more successful when fighting at their acclimation temperature than at a colder or warmer temperature, and that changes in metabolic capacity underlie differences in behavioural performance. 2. Thermal acclimation (to 20 degrees C and to 30 degrees C) had a significant effect on behavioural contests, and the likelihood of winning was significantly greater when individuals fought at their acclimation temperature against an individual from an alternate acclimation temperature. 3. The ratio of ADP stimulated respiration to proton leak (respiratory control ratio) of isolated mitochondria increased significantly in chelae muscle of the cold-acclimated group, and differences in respiratory control ratio between winners and losers were significantly correlated with the outcome of agonistic encounters. However, acclimation did not affect tall muscle mitochondria or the activity of pyruvate kinase in either chelae or tail muscle. 4. The force produced by closing chelae was thermally insensitive within acclimation groups, and there were no significant differences between acclimation treatments. None the less, differences in chelae width between contestants were significantly correlated with the outcome of agonistic encounters, but this perceived resource holding power did not reflect the actual power of force production. 5. Thermal acclimation in C destructor has beneficial consequences for dominance and competitive ability, and the success of cold acclimated animals at the cold temperatures can be at least partly explained by concomitant up-regulation of oxidative ATP production capacity.
Keyword acclimation
agonistic behaviour
fitness
mitochondria
phenotypic plasticity
Beneficial Acclimation Hypothesis
Phenotypic Plasticity
Evolutionary Adaptation
Drosophila-melanogaster
Orconectes-rusticus
Escherichia-coli
Fish Muscle
Temperature
Behavior
Performance
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 20:38:18 EST