Present Tree Planting and Management Activities in Four Rural Communities in Leyte Province, the Philippines

Cedamon, Edwin D., Emtage, Nick F., Suh, Jungho, Herbohn, John L., Harrison, Steve R. and Mangaoang, Eduardo O. (2005) Present Tree Planting and Management Activities in Four Rural Communities in Leyte Province, the Philippines. Annals of Tropical Research, 27 1: 19-34.

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Author Cedamon, Edwin D.
Emtage, Nick F.
Suh, Jungho
Herbohn, John L.
Harrison, Steve R.
Mangaoang, Eduardo O.
Title Present Tree Planting and Management Activities in Four Rural Communities in Leyte Province, the Philippines
Journal name Annals of Tropical Research
ISSN 0116-1710
Publication date 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 27
Issue 1
Start page 19
End page 34
Editor Steve R. Harrison
Eduardo O. Mangaoang
John L. Herbohn
Jerome K. Vanclay,
Paciencia P. Milan
Victor B. Asio
Jungho Suh
Place of publication Gatton, Qld, Australia
Publisher The University of Queensland
Language eng
Subject 300602 Tree Improvement (Selection, Breeding and Genetic Engineering)
300606 Agroforestry
300600 Forestry Sciences
300604 Management and Environment
Abstract Demand for timber in Leyte Province continues to increase whilst supplies from domestic sources have contracted following suspension of logging in remaining natural forests. One approach to meet the deficit in timber supplies has been to encourage timber planting by smallholders. A survey was undertaken in four rural communities to help assess present tree planting and management activities of households and their tree planting and management intentions. It was found out that not more than 100 trees are managed by each of about 61% of the households who have planted trees. There were 88 different species planted or managed by households, but 83% of the total trees planted belong to only 10 species, including mahogany, ipil-ipil, gmelina and molave. The primary purpose of tree planting is to meet household needs for timber for dwelling construction and fruit production. About 72% of the total trees being managed by households were planted, as distinct from natural regeneration, with planting stock coming mostly from own seeds, nursery and wildlings. Only four respondents had registered any of their trees with the Department of Natural Resources and Environment (necessary for commercial harvesting), the main reason for lack of registration appearing to be lack of awareness of this procedure.
Keyword smallholder farmers
household survey
trees planted
tree number
species choice
on-farm timber use
tree registration
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Created: Fri, 02 Jun 2006, 10:00:00 EST by Annerine Bosch on behalf of School of Integrative Systems