Dietary selectivity for the toxic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula and resultant growth rates in two species of opisthobranch mollusc

Capper, A., Tibbetts, I. R., ONeil, J. M. and Shaw, G. R. (2006) Dietary selectivity for the toxic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula and resultant growth rates in two species of opisthobranch mollusc. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology And Ecology, 331 2: 133-144. doi:10.1016/j.jembe.2005.10.009


Author Capper, A.
Tibbetts, I. R.
ONeil, J. M.
Shaw, G. R.
Title Dietary selectivity for the toxic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula and resultant growth rates in two species of opisthobranch mollusc
Journal name Journal of Experimental Marine Biology And Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0981
Publication date 2006-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jembe.2005.10.009
Volume 331
Issue 2
Start page 133
End page 144
Total pages 12
Place of publication Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Subject C1
270702 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract Trophodynamics of blooms of the toxic marine cyanobacterium Lyngkya majuscula were investigated to determine dietary specificity in two putative grazers: the opisthobranch molluscs, Stylocheilus striatus and Bursatella leachii. S. striatus is associated with L. majuscula blooms and is known to sequester L. majuscula metabolites. The dietary specificity and toxicodynamics of B. leachii in relation to L. majuscula is less well documented. In this study we found diet history had no significant effect upon dietary selectivity of S. striatus when offered a range of plant species. However, L. majuscula chemotype may alter S. striatus' selectivity for this cyanobacterium. Daily biomass increases between small and large size groups of both species were recorded in no-choice consumption trials using L. majuscula. Both S. striatus and B. leachii preferentially consumed L. majuscula containing lyngbyatoxin-a. Increase in mass over a 10-day period in B. leachii (915%) was significantly greater than S. striatus (150%), yet S. striatus consumed greater quantities of L. majuscula (g day(-1)) and thus had a lower conversion efficiency (0.038) than B. leachii (0.081) based on sea hare weight per gram of L. majuscula consumed day(-1). Our findings suggest that growth rates and conversion efficiencies may be influenced by sea hare maximum growth potential, acquisition of secondary metabolites or diet type. (C) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keyword Ecology
Marine & Freshwater Biology
Bursatella Leachii
Feeding Preference And Deterrence
Lyngbya Majuscula Toxins
Sea Hare
Stylocheilus Striatus (formerly Longicauda)
Hare Stylocheilus-longicauda
Feeding Preference Experiments
Algal Secondary Metabolites
Marine Natural-products
Leachii-plei Rang
Sea Hares
Bursatella-leachii
Dolabella-auricularia
Laboratory Culture
Chemical Defenses
Q-Index Code C1
Additional Notes DOI: 10.1359/jbmr.2003.18.10.1901

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 20:35:22 EST