Husbandry and trade of indigenous chickens in Myanmar - results of a participatory rural appraisal in the Yangon and the Mandalay divisions

Henning, J., Khin, A., Hla, T. and Meers, J. (2006) Husbandry and trade of indigenous chickens in Myanmar - results of a participatory rural appraisal in the Yangon and the Mandalay divisions. Tropical Animal Health Production, 38 7-8: 611-618. doi:10.1007/s11250-006-4425-1


Author Henning, J.
Khin, A.
Hla, T.
Meers, J.
Title Husbandry and trade of indigenous chickens in Myanmar - results of a participatory rural appraisal in the Yangon and the Mandalay divisions
Journal name Tropical Animal Health Production   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0049-4747
Publication date 2006-10-01
Year available 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s11250-006-4425-1
Open Access Status
Volume 38
Issue 7-8
Start page 611
End page 618
Total pages 8
Editor A. G. Luckins
Place of publication Netherlands
Publisher Springer-Verlag
Language eng
Subject C1
300503 Epidemiology
630500 Sustainable Animal Production Systems
Abstract There is a variety of professions working with village chickens in developing countries, including farmers, veterinarians and chicken traders. People from all these occupations were involved in a participatory rural appraisal to investigate husbandry practices and trade of village chickens in Myanmar. Data were collected in two climatically different regions of the country, in the Yangon and in the Mandalay divisions. The breeding and training of fighting cocks was practised only in the Mandalay division, with well-trained birds sold for very high prices. Apart from this, chickens were raised in both regions mainly for small disposable income and were generally sold when money was needed, in particular during religious festivals. Chicken traders on bicycles, often called 'middle men', usually purchase birds from farmers in about 10 villages per day. Several 'middle men' supply birds to wealthier chicken merchants, who sell these birds at larger chicken markets. There is in general limited knowledge among farmers about the prevention of Newcastle disease via vaccination. Commercial indigenous chicken production is practised in Myanmar, but family poultry farming dominates indigenous chicken production in the country.
Keyword Husbandry
indigenous
chickens
Myanmar
Yangon
Mandalay
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 20:17:46 EST