The effects of equine skin preparation on transdermal drug penetration in vitro

Mills, PC and Cross, SE (2006) The effects of equine skin preparation on transdermal drug penetration in vitro. Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research-revue Canadienne De Recherche Veterinaire, 70 4: 317-320.

Author Mills, PC
Cross, SE
Title The effects of equine skin preparation on transdermal drug penetration in vitro
Journal name Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research-revue Canadienne De Recherche Veterinaire   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0830-9000
Publication date 2006-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status PMC
Volume 70
Issue 4
Start page 317
End page 320
Total pages 4
Editor Dr Eva Nagy; Heather Broughton
Place of publication Canada
Publisher Canadian Vet. Medical Assoc.
Language eng
Subject C1
300512 Pharmacology
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract An increasing number of formulations are applied to equine skin, yet variable penetration can affect efficacy, or the incidence of adverse effects, or both. To investigate the effects of common methods of skin preparation on transdermal drug penetration in vitro, we clipped, harvested, and froze skin samples from 5 Thoroughbred geldings. Thawed samples were prepared as follows: control (no preparation); cleaned with aqueous chlorhexidine (Aq-C, 0.1% w/v); cleaned with alcoholic chlorhexidine (Al-C, 0.5% w/v); shaved (Sh); or tape-stripped (Ta) with the use of adhesive tape. The samples were then placed in diffusion cells, and 2 g of methylsalicylate (MeSa) gel (Dencorub) was applied to the stratum corneum side. The penetration of MeSa and its analyte, salicylate (Sa), through the skin samples was measured over 10 h. Compared with control skin, significantly more MeSa penetrated through skin prepared with Al-C or Sh (P < 0.01) or with Aq-C or Ta (P < 0.05), and significantly more Sa was recovered in the receptor phase from skin prepared with Aq-C, Al-C, or Sh (P < 0.05) or with Ta (P < 0.01). A significantly higher rate of penetration and shorter lag time were also noted for MeSa with all the prepared skin samples, compared with the control samples. The results show that clinical techniques routinely used to clean or prepare skin can significantly affect the rate and extent of penetration of a topically applied drug. This may result in greater systemic availability of active drug, which could lead to enhanced efficacy and, possibly, a higher incidence of adverse effects.
Keyword Equine
Skin
Transdermal
In Vistro
Veterinary Sciences
Barrier Function
Percutaneous-absorption
Solute Lipophilicity
Application Site
Canine Skin
Vivo
Pharmacokinetics
Microdialysis
Permeability
Transport
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2007 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 20:05:49 EST