The role of self-efficacy in predicting rule-following behaviors in shelters for homeless youth: A test of the theory of planned behavior

Broadhead-Fearn, Danielle and White, Katherine M. (2006) The role of self-efficacy in predicting rule-following behaviors in shelters for homeless youth: A test of the theory of planned behavior. Journal of Social Psychology, 146 3: 307-325. doi:10.3200/SOCP.146.3.307-325


Author Broadhead-Fearn, Danielle
White, Katherine M.
Title The role of self-efficacy in predicting rule-following behaviors in shelters for homeless youth: A test of the theory of planned behavior
Journal name Journal of Social Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-4545
Publication date 2006-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3200/SOCP.146.3.307-325
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 146
Issue 3
Start page 307
End page 325
Total pages 19
Editor Chris J. deGrazia
Place of publication Washington D.C., USA
Publisher Heldref Publications
Language eng
Subject CX
Abstract Through a prospective study of 70 youths staying at homeless-youth shelters, the authors tested the utility of I. Ajzen's (1991) theory of planned behavior (TPB), by comparing the constructs of self-efficacy with perceived behavioral control (PBC), in predicting people's rule-following behavior during shelter stays. They performed the 1st wave of data collection through a questionnaire assessing the standard TPB components of attitudes, subjective norms, PBC, and behavioral intentions in relation to following the set rules at youth shelters. Further, they distinguished between items assessing PBC (or perceived control) and those reflecting self-efficacy (or perceived difficulty). At the completion of each youth's stay at the shelter, shelter staff rated the rule adherence for that participant. Regression analyses revealed some support for the TPB in that subjective norm was a significant predictor of intentions. However, self-efficacy emerged as the strongest predictor of intentions and was the only significant predictor of rule-following behavior. Thus, the results of the present study indicate the possibility that self-efficacy is integral to predicting rule adherence within this context and reaffirm the importance of incorporating notions of people's perceived ease or difficulty in performing actions in models of attitude-behavior prediction.
Keyword attitude-behavior relations
homeless youth
rule adherence
self-efficacy
theory of planned behavior
Perceived Control
Intentions
Perceptions
Adolescents
Attitudes
Runaway
Norms
Q-Index Code CX

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 19:23:35 EST