The influence of body size on the diving behaviour and physiology of the bimodally respiring turtle, Elseya albagula

Mathie, N. J. and Franklin, C. E. (2006) The influence of body size on the diving behaviour and physiology of the bimodally respiring turtle, Elseya albagula. Journal of Comparative Physiology B-biochemical Systemic And Environmental Physiology, 176 8: 739-747. doi:10.1007/s00360-006-0095-6


Author Mathie, N. J.
Franklin, C. E.
Title The influence of body size on the diving behaviour and physiology of the bimodally respiring turtle, Elseya albagula
Journal name Journal of Comparative Physiology B-biochemical Systemic And Environmental Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0174-1578
1432-136X
Publication date 2006-11-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00360-006-0095-6
Volume 176
Issue 8
Start page 739
End page 747
Total pages 9
Place of publication Heidelberg
Publisher Springer Heidelberg
Language eng
Subject C1
270700 Ecology and Evolution
780105 Biological sciences
0606 Physiology
Abstract In aquatic vertebrates that acquire oxygen aerially dive duration scales positively with body mass, i.e. larger animals can dive for longer periods, however in bimodally respiring animals the relationship between dive duration and body mass is unclear. In this study we investigated the relationships between body size, aquatic respiration, and dive duration in the bimodally respiring turtle, Elseya albagula. Under normoxic conditions, dive duration was found to be independent of body mass. The dive durations of smaller turtles were equivalent to that of larger individuals despite their relatively smaller oxygen stores and higher mass specific metabolic rates. Smaller turtles were able to increase their dive duration through the use of aquatic respiration. Smaller turtles had a relatively higher cloacal bursae surface area than larger turtles, which allowed them to extract a relatively larger amount of oxygen from the water. By removing the ability to respire aquatically (hypoxic conditions), the dive duration of the smaller turtles significantly decreased restoring the normal positive relationship between body size and dive duration that is seen in other air-breathing vertebrates.
Keyword Turtle
Oxygen Storage
Allometric Scaling
Diving
Aquatic Respiration
Physiology
Zoology
Blood-oxygen Transport
Rheodytes-leukops
Emydura-macquarii
Respiration
Temperature
Submergence
Vertebrates
Ecology
Scripta
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 19:21:24 EST