Systematic changes in the duration and precision of interception in response to variation of amplitude and effector size

Tresilian, James R. and Plooy, Annaliese (2006) Systematic changes in the duration and precision of interception in response to variation of amplitude and effector size. Experimental Brain Research, 171 4: 421-435. doi:10.1007/s00221-005-0286-5


Author Tresilian, James R.
Plooy, Annaliese
Title Systematic changes in the duration and precision of interception in response to variation of amplitude and effector size
Journal name Experimental Brain Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0014-4819
1432-1106
Publication date 2006-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00221-005-0286-5
Volume 171
Issue 4
Start page 421
End page 435
Total pages 15
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Subject C1
321403 Motor Control
780108 Behavioural and cognitive sciences
1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Abstract The results of two experiments are reported that examined how performance in a simple interceptive action (hitting a moving target) was influenced by the speed of the target, the size of the intercepting effector and the distance moved to make the interception. In Experiment 1, target speed and the width of the intercepting manipulandum (bat) were varied. The hypothesis that people make briefer movements, when the temporal accuracy and precision demands of the task are high, predicts that bat width and target speed will divisively interact in their effect on movement time (MT) and that shorter MTs will be associated with a smaller temporal variable error (VE). An alternative hypothesis that people initiate movement when the rate of expansion (ROE) of the target's image reaches a specific, fixed criterion value predicts that bat width will have no effect on MT. The results supported the first hypothesis: a statistically reliable interaction of the predicted form was obtained and the temporal VE was smaller for briefer movements. In Experiment 2, distance to move and target speed were varied. MT increased in direct proportion to distance and there was a divisive interaction between distance and speed; as in Experiment 1, temporal VE was smaller for briefer movements. The pattern of results could not be explained by the strategy of initiating movement at a fixed value of the ROE or at a fixed value of any other perceptual variable potentially available for initiating movement. It is argued that the results support pre-programming of MT with movement initiated when the target's time to arrival at the interception location reaches a criterion value that is matched to the pre-programmed MT. The data supported completely open-loop control when MT was less than between 200 and 240 ms with corrective sub-movements increasingly frequent for movements of longer duration.
Keyword Visual perception
Human
Interception
Timing
Movement
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 20 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 20 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 19:17:56 EST