Stepping Stones Triple P: A pilot study to evaluate acceptability of the program by parents of a child diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

Whittingham, K., Sofronoff, K. and Sheffield, J. K. (2006) Stepping Stones Triple P: A pilot study to evaluate acceptability of the program by parents of a child diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. Research In Developmental Disabilities, 27 4: 364-380. doi:10.1016/j.ridd.2005.05.003


Author Whittingham, K.
Sofronoff, K.
Sheffield, J. K.
Title Stepping Stones Triple P: A pilot study to evaluate acceptability of the program by parents of a child diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder
Journal name Research In Developmental Disabilities   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0891-4222
Publication date 2006-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ridd.2005.05.003
Volume 27
Issue 4
Start page 364
End page 380
Total pages 17
Editor J.M. Matson
Place of publication Oxford
Publisher Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd
Language eng
Subject C1
380106 Developmental Psychology and Ageing
730211 Mental health
Abstract The experience of parents of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in standard parenting programs has not been researched, although anecdotal evidence suggests that they do not find them acceptable. Forty-two parents of children with ASD were asked to view a DVD explaining individual parenting strategies from Stepping Stones, a new branch of the Triple P program targeted specifically at parents of children with disabilities. Parents were asked to rate each strategy for acceptability, usability and behavioural intention, i.e., their intention to use the strategy. Additionally, parental attributions and parental perceived control were explored as possible barriers to positive evaluations of Stepping Stones parenting strategies. A focus group of parents was used to gather more detailed parent response to the program. Parent responses to the program were generally positive and attribution of the child's behaviour to uncontrollable factors was found to predict higher ratings of usability. The results were interpreted within the context of Weiner's attributional theory and the theory of reasoned action. The limitations of this study and suggestions for future research are discussed. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Stepping Stones Triple P
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Parenting Programs
Education, Special
Rehabilitation
Follow-up
Behavior
Prevalence
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 19:15:52 EST