Safety behaviors and dysfunctional beliefs about sleep: Testing a cognitive model of the maintenance of insomnia

Woodley, J and Smith, S (2006) Safety behaviors and dysfunctional beliefs about sleep: Testing a cognitive model of the maintenance of insomnia. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 60 6: 551-557. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychores.2006.03.002


Author Woodley, J
Smith, S
Title Safety behaviors and dysfunctional beliefs about sleep: Testing a cognitive model of the maintenance of insomnia
Journal name Journal of Psychosomatic Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-3999
Publication date 2006-01-01
Year available 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2006.03.002
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 60
Issue 6
Start page 551
End page 557
Total pages 7
Editor C.M. Shapiro and F. Creed
Place of publication Oxford
Publisher Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd
Language eng
Subject C1
329999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
730219 Behaviour and health
Abstract Objective: Our aim was to determine if insomnia severity, dysfunctional beliefs about sleep, and depression predicted sleep-related safety behaviors. Method: Standard sleep-related measures (such as the Insomnia Severity Index; the Dysfunctional Beliefs About Sleep scale; the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale; and the Sleep-Related Behaviors Questionnaire) were administered. Additionally, 14 days of sleep diary (Pittsburg Sleep Diary) data and actual use of sleep-related behaviors were collected. Results: Regression analysis revealed that dysfunctional beliefs about sleep predicted sleep-related safety behaviors. Insomnia severity did not predict sleep-related safety behaviors. Depression accounted for the greatest amount of unique variance in the prediction of safety behaviors, followed by dysfunctional beliefs. Exploratory analysis revealed that participants with higher levels of depression used more sleep-related behaviors and reported greater dysfunctional beliefs about their sleep. Conclusion: The findings underlie the significant influence that dysfunctional beliefs have on individuals' behaviors. Moreover, the results suggest that depression may need to be considered as an explicit component of cognitive-behavioral models of insomnia. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Keyword Insomnia
Dysfunctional Beliefs About Sleep
Sleep-related Safety Behaviors
Sleep-related Behaviors Questionnaire
Psychiatry
Stress Scales Dass
Psychiatric-disorders
Late-life
Anxiety
Depression
Therapy
Persistence
Symptoms
Adolescents
Parameters
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2007 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 18 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 19:12:10 EST