Is the distribution of Fiji leaf gall in Australian sugarcane explained by variation in the vector Perkinsiella saccharicida?

Ridley, A. W., Dhileepan, K., Johnson, K. N., Allsopp, P. G., Nutt, K. A., Walter, G. H. and Croft, B. J. (2006) Is the distribution of Fiji leaf gall in Australian sugarcane explained by variation in the vector Perkinsiella saccharicida?. Australasian Plant Pathology, 35 2: 103-112. doi:10.1071/AP06011


Author Ridley, A. W.
Dhileepan, K.
Johnson, K. N.
Allsopp, P. G.
Nutt, K. A.
Walter, G. H.
Croft, B. J.
Title Is the distribution of Fiji leaf gall in Australian sugarcane explained by variation in the vector Perkinsiella saccharicida?
Journal name Australasian Plant Pathology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0815-3191
Publication date 2006-01-01
Year available 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/AP06011
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 35
Issue 2
Start page 103
End page 112
Total pages 10
Place of publication Collingwood
Publisher Csiro Publishing
Language eng
Subject C1
270706 Life Histories (incl. Population Ecology)
770804 Control of pests and exotic species
Abstract Fiji leaf gall (FLG) is an important virally induced disease in Australian sugarcane. It is confined to southern canegrowing areas, despite its vector, the delphacid planthopper Perkinsiella saccharicida, occurring in all canegrowing areas of Queensland and New South Wales. This disparity between distributions could be a result of successful containment of the disease through quarantine and/or geographical barriers, or because northern Queensland populations of Perkinsiella may be poorer vectors of the disease. These hypotheses were first tested by investigating variation in the ITS2 region of the rDNA fragment among eastern Australian and overseas populations of Perkinsiella. The ITS2 sequences of the Western Australian P. thompsoni and the Fijian P. vitiensis were distinguishable from those of P. saccharicida and there was no significant variation among the 26P. saccharicida populations. Reciprocal crosses of a northern Queensland and a southern Queensland population of P. saccharicida were fertile, so they may well be conspecific. Single vector transmission experiments showed that a population of P. saccharicida from northern Queensland had a higher vector competency than either of two southern Queensland populations. The frequency of virus acquisition in the vector populations was demonstrated to be important in the vector competency of the planthopper. The proportion of infected vectors that transmitted the virus to plants was not significantly different among the populations tested. This study shows that the absence of FLG from northern Queensland is not due to a lack of vector competency of the northern population of P. saccharicida.
Keyword Acquisition
Fiji Disease Virus
Perkinsiella
Reovirus
Transmission
Plant Sciences
Disease Virus
Insect Vector
Aedes-aegypti
Diptera
Competence
Culicidae
Dengue-2
Cells
Dwarf
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 18:52:07 EST