Factors affecting female reproductive success and the survival of pouch young in the threatened brush-tailed rock-wallaby, Petrogale penicillata

Wynd, N. M., Sigg, D. P., Pople, A. R., Hazlitt, S. L. and Goldizen, A. W. (2006) Factors affecting female reproductive success and the survival of pouch young in the threatened brush-tailed rock-wallaby, Petrogale penicillata. Australian Journal of Zoology, 54 2: 61-70. doi:10.1071/ZO05064


Author Wynd, N. M.
Sigg, D. P.
Pople, A. R.
Hazlitt, S. L.
Goldizen, A. W.
Title Factors affecting female reproductive success and the survival of pouch young in the threatened brush-tailed rock-wallaby, Petrogale penicillata
Journal name Australian Journal of Zoology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-959X
Publication date 2006-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/ZO05064
Volume 54
Issue 2
Start page 61
End page 70
Total pages 10
Place of publication Collingwood
Publisher Csiro Publishing
Language eng
Subject C1
270706 Life Histories (incl. Population Ecology)
770703 Living resources (flora and fauna)
Abstract Knowledge of factors affecting the survival of individuals and their reproductive success is essential for threatened species management, but studies assessing these factors are lacking for many threatened rock-wallaby species. In this study we investigated the factors influencing the breeding performance of females and the survival of pouch young in a wild colony of the threatened brush-tailed rock-wallaby. Individuals were trapped between October 2000 and April 2004. More than 50% of the females in the colony were breeding below their full potential and giving birth to only one offspring per year. Most females within the colony bred in synchrony, with a substantial birth peak evident during autumn. Pouch young born in autumn left the pouch during spring and were weaned during summer and autumn when forage was most abundant. Pouch young born during the autumn birth peak or in winter had a substantially higher probability of surviving through to pouch emergence than those born during spring or summer. This study provides demographic parameters that may be used in population models and for comparison with other populations, particularly those that are small and declining. To optimise reproductive success in reintroduction programs, females in good condition and with small pouch young should be released at the end of the wettest season.
Keyword Zoology
Red-necked Wallabies
New-south-wales
Population-dynamics
Grey Kangaroos
Age Estimation
Recruitment
Seasonality
Captivity
Quality
Growth
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 18:45:14 EST