The associations among self-awareness, emotional well-being, and employment outcome following acquired brain injury: A 12-month longitudinal study

Ownsworth, Tamara, Desbois, Jennifer, Grant, Eliza, Fleming, Jennifer and Strong, Jenny (2006) The associations among self-awareness, emotional well-being, and employment outcome following acquired brain injury: A 12-month longitudinal study. Rehabilitation Psychology, 51 1: 50-59. doi:10.1037/0090-5550.51.1.50


Author Ownsworth, Tamara
Desbois, Jennifer
Grant, Eliza
Fleming, Jennifer
Strong, Jenny
Title The associations among self-awareness, emotional well-being, and employment outcome following acquired brain injury: A 12-month longitudinal study
Journal name Rehabilitation Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0090-5550
1939-1544
Publication date 2006-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/0090-5550.51.1.50
Volume 51
Issue 1
Start page 50
End page 59
Total pages 10
Editor T.R. Elliot
Place of publication Washington, DC, USA
Publisher Educational Pub. Foundation
Language eng
Subject C1
321024 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Occupational and Physical
730303 Occupational, speech and physiotherapy
Formatted abstract
Objective:
To investigate self-awareness and emotional well-being according to change in employment outcome in people with acquired brain injury (ABI).

Design:

A 12-month longitudinal study.

Participants and Setting:
Fifty adults with ABI attending outpatient rehabilitation (n = 17) or vocational rehabilitation services (n = 33). Time since injury ranged from 6 months to 12 years (M = 4.3 years, SD = 4.1).

Main Outcome Measures:

Self Awareness of Deficits Interview, Self-Regulation Skills Interview, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, and employment outcome (stable employment, improved employment, and stable unemployment).

Results:

At the initial assessment, level of awareness for the improved employment group was significantly lower than that for the stable employment group (P <.017), whereas no between-groups differences were found at the 12-month follow-up assessment. Employment outcome was not significantly associated with changes in self-monitoring or emotional well-being (p >.017). Demographic and injury-related variables were generally not related to employment outcome.

Conclusions:

The findings empirically support the theoretical view that an increase in self-awareness is associated with improved employment status, although the direction of this relation is unclear.
Keyword Psychology, Clinical
Rehabilitation
Self-awareness
Emotional Well-being
Employment
Acquired Brain Injury
Impaired Awareness
Predicting Return
Head Trauma
Work
Deficits
Depression
Community
Adults
Integration
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 18:09:11 EST