The associations among self-awareness, emotional well-being, and employment outcome following acquired brain injury: A 12-month longitudinal study

Ownsworth, Tamara, Desbois, Jennifer, Grant, Eliza, Fleming, Jennifer and Strong, Jenny (2006) The associations among self-awareness, emotional well-being, and employment outcome following acquired brain injury: A 12-month longitudinal study. Rehabilitation Psychology, 51 1: 50-59. doi:10.1037/0090-5550.51.1.50


Author Ownsworth, Tamara
Desbois, Jennifer
Grant, Eliza
Fleming, Jennifer
Strong, Jenny
Title The associations among self-awareness, emotional well-being, and employment outcome following acquired brain injury: A 12-month longitudinal study
Journal name Rehabilitation Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0090-5550
1939-1544
Publication date 2006-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/0090-5550.51.1.50
Volume 51
Issue 1
Start page 50
End page 59
Total pages 10
Editor T.R. Elliot
Place of publication Washington, DC, USA
Publisher Educational Pub. Foundation
Collection year 2006
Language eng
Subject C1
321024 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Occupational and Physical
730303 Occupational, speech and physiotherapy
Formatted abstract
Objective:
To investigate self-awareness and emotional well-being according to change in employment outcome in people with acquired brain injury (ABI).

Design:

A 12-month longitudinal study.

Participants and Setting:
Fifty adults with ABI attending outpatient rehabilitation (n = 17) or vocational rehabilitation services (n = 33). Time since injury ranged from 6 months to 12 years (M = 4.3 years, SD = 4.1).

Main Outcome Measures:

Self Awareness of Deficits Interview, Self-Regulation Skills Interview, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, and employment outcome (stable employment, improved employment, and stable unemployment).

Results:

At the initial assessment, level of awareness for the improved employment group was significantly lower than that for the stable employment group (P <.017), whereas no between-groups differences were found at the 12-month follow-up assessment. Employment outcome was not significantly associated with changes in self-monitoring or emotional well-being (p >.017). Demographic and injury-related variables were generally not related to employment outcome.

Conclusions:

The findings empirically support the theoretical view that an increase in self-awareness is associated with improved employment status, although the direction of this relation is unclear.
Keyword Psychology, Clinical
Rehabilitation
Self-awareness
Emotional Well-being
Employment
Acquired Brain Injury
Impaired Awareness
Predicting Return
Head Trauma
Work
Deficits
Depression
Community
Adults
Integration
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 18:09:11 EST