Microhabitat use by black-faced impala in the Etosha National Park, Namibia

Matson, T. K., Goldizen, A. W. and Jarman, P. J. (2005) Microhabitat use by black-faced impala in the Etosha National Park, Namibia. Journal of Wildlife Management, 69 4: 1708-1715. doi:10.2193/0022-541X(2005)69[1708:MUBBII]2.0.CO;2


Author Matson, T. K.
Goldizen, A. W.
Jarman, P. J.
Title Microhabitat use by black-faced impala in the Etosha National Park, Namibia
Journal name Journal of Wildlife Management   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-541X
Publication date 2005-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.2193/0022-541X(2005)69[1708:MUBBII]2.0.CO;2
Volume 69
Issue 4
Start page 1708
End page 1715
Total pages 8
Editor R Scott Lutz
Place of publication Bethesda
Publisher The Wildlife Society
Language eng
Subject C1
270703 Terrestrial Ecology
770903 Living resources (flora and fauna)
Abstract We Studied microhabitat use by black-faced impala in different herd types during the rut in the cold dry seasons of 2001 and 2002 in the Etosha National Park, Namibia. We investigated whether black-faced impala select feeding sites consistently for their microhabitat characteristics in 2 vegetation types, Karstveld and Tamboti Woodland. We also investigated intra-population differences in microhabitat use between herds of different types. In both habitats, sites used by impala for feeding were more likely to be in the shade, within 2 m of the edges of wooded areas and grassy clearings, with high visibility at I m height, and with lower grass swords than nearby nonfeeding sites. In Karstveld, feeding sites of impala were also located closer to the nearest shrub than were nonfeeding sites. A degree of fine-scale sexual segregation in microhabitat use was demonstrated, but it was not consistent across habitats. Incorporating these trends in the microhabitat use of black-faced impala into management, decisions should maximize the success Of Small populations released at selected off-park sites.
Keyword Black-faced Impala
Aepyceros Melampus Petersi
Etosha National Park
Namibia
Microhabitat Use
Ecology
Zoology
Predation
Selection
Food
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 17:44:45 EST