Benefit finding in multiple sclerosis, and associations with positive and negative outcomes

Pakenham, K . I. (2005) Benefit finding in multiple sclerosis, and associations with positive and negative outcomes. Health Psychology, 24 2: 123-132. doi:10.1037/0278-6133.24.1.123


Author Pakenham, K . I.
Title Benefit finding in multiple sclerosis, and associations with positive and negative outcomes
Journal name Health Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0278-6133
Publication date 2005-01-01
Year available 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/0278-6133.24.1.123
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 24
Issue 2
Start page 123
End page 132
Total pages 10
Editor Dr Robert M Kaplan
Place of publication USA
Publisher American Psychological Association
Language eng
Subject C1
380109 Psychological Methodology, Design and Analysis
730219 Behaviour and health
Abstract This study examined the direct and stress-buffering effects of benefit finding on positive and negative outcomes. A total of 502 people with multiple sclerosis completed a questionnaire at Time 1 and, 3 months later, at Time 2 (n = 404). Measures of illness were collected at Time 1, and number of problems, stress appraisal, benefit finding, subjective health, and negative (global distress, negative affect) and positive (life satisfaction, positive affect, dyadic adjustment) outcomes were measured at Time 2. Factor analyses showed the Benefit Finding scale to have 2 dimensions: Personal Growth and Family Relations Growth. Hierarchical regressions showed that after controlling for the effects of demographics, illness, problems, and appraisal, benefit finding showed strong direct effects on the positive outcomes. Benefit finding did not have a direct effect on distress, or subjective health but had a weak association with negative affect. Family Relations Growth had a stress-buffering effect on distress.
Keyword Psychology
Psychology, Clinical
Benefit Finding
Multiple Sclerosis
Coping
Adjustment
Stage Breast-cancer
Social Support
Posttraumatic Growth
Dyadic Adjustment
Mental-health
Stress
Women
Hiv
Validation
Hypothesis
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 17:35:25 EST