Relations between companion animals and self-reported health in older women: Cause, effect or artifact

Pachana, N. A., Ford, J. H., Andrew, B. and Dobson, A. J. (2005) Relations between companion animals and self-reported health in older women: Cause, effect or artifact. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 12 2: 103-110. doi:10.1207/s15327558ijbm1202_8

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Author Pachana, N. A.
Ford, J. H.
Andrew, B.
Dobson, A. J.
Title Relations between companion animals and self-reported health in older women: Cause, effect or artifact
Journal name International Journal of Behavioral Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1070-5503
Publication date 2005-01-01
Year available 2005
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1207/s15327558ijbm1202_8
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 12
Issue 2
Start page 103
End page 110
Total pages 8
Editor Gail Ironson
Lynda Powell
Place of publication USA
Publisher Lawrence Erlbaum
Language eng
Subject C1
380109 Psychological Methodology, Design and Analysis
730211 Mental health
Abstract A large longitudinal dataset on women's health in Australia provided the basis of analysis of potential positive health effects of living with a companion animal. Age, living arrangements, and housing all strongly related to both living with companion animals and health. Methodological problems in using data from observational studies to disentangle a potential association in the presence of substantial effects of demographic characteristics are highlighted. Our findings may help to explain some inconsistencies and contradictions in the literature about the health benefits of companion animals, as well as offer suggestions for ways to more forward in future investigations of human-pet relationships.
Keyword Psychology, Clinical
Companion Animals
Women's Health
Epidemiology
Methodology
Sociodemographics
One-year Survival
Pet Ownership
Psychological Health
Social Support
Attachment
Families
People
Cats
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 27 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 17:26:25 EST