Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia: An example of the co-existence of significant marine mammal populations and large-scale coastal development

Chilvers, B. L., Lawler, I. R., Macknight, F. L., Marsh, H. W., Noad, M. J. and Paterson, R. (2005) Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia: An example of the co-existence of significant marine mammal populations and large-scale coastal development. Biological Conservation, 122 4: 559-571. doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2004.08.013


Author Chilvers, B. L.
Lawler, I. R.
Macknight, F. L.
Marsh, H. W.
Noad, M. J.
Paterson, R.
Title Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia: An example of the co-existence of significant marine mammal populations and large-scale coastal development
Journal name Biological Conservation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0006-3207
Publication date 2005-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.biocon.2004.08.013
Volume 122
Issue 4
Start page 559
End page 571
Total pages 13
Editor R. Marrs
Place of publication Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject C1
270707 Sociobiology and Behavioural Ecology
770302 Living resources (incl. impacts of fishing on non-target species)
270702 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
770406 Integrated (ecosystem) assessment and management
Abstract Recent analyses assert that large marine vertebrates such as marine mammals are now 'functionally or entirely extinct in most coastal ecosystems'. Moreton Bay is a large diverse marine ecosystem bordering the fastest growing area in Australia. The human population is over 1.6 million and increasing yearly by between 10% and 13% with resultant impacts upon the adjoining marine environment. Nonetheless, significant populations of three species of marine mammals are resident within Moreton Bay and a further 14 species are seasonal or occasional visitors. This paper reviews the current and historical distributions and abundance of these species in the context of the current management regime and suggests initiatives to increase the resilience of marine mammal populations to the changes wrought by the burgeoning human population in coastal environments. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Ecology
Environmental Sciences
Cetaceans
Dugong
Coastal Development
South-east Queensland
Management
Bottle-nosed Dolphins
Whales Megaptera-novaeangliae
Dugongs
Abundance
Ecosystems
Migration
Waters
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 16:56:21 EST