The impact of poster advertising in buses on young people's awareness and knowledge of a telephone counselling service

King, R., Bickman, L., Nurcombe, B., Hides, L. and Reid, W. (2005) The impact of poster advertising in buses on young people's awareness and knowledge of a telephone counselling service. Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 16 1: 74-77.

Author King, R.
Bickman, L.
Nurcombe, B.
Hides, L.
Reid, W.
Title The impact of poster advertising in buses on young people's awareness and knowledge of a telephone counselling service
Journal name Health Promotion Journal of Australia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1036-1973
Publication date 2005-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 16
Issue 1
Start page 74
End page 77
Total pages 4
Editor R. Moodie
C. Rissel
M. Wise
A. Bauman
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Publisher Australian Health Promotion Association
Language eng
Subject C1
321021 Psychiatry
730211 Mental health
Formatted abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of a public poster advertising campaign for Kids Help Line, a national Australian telephone counselling service providing young people with 24-hour access to trained counsellors.
METHODS: Posters were displayed in the interior of 50% of all Brisbane City Council buses for a period of six months. 1,642 high school students were surveyed at the end of the campaign to determine their awareness and knowledge of Kids Help Line services. Awareness and knowledge of frequent bus users was compared with that of non-bus users and the linear relationship between bus usage and awareness and knowledge was investigated.
RESULTS: After controlling for age, socio-economic status and gender effects, there was evidence of a linear relationship between exposure to advertisements and expectation that Kids Help Line could assist with a larger range of problems. There was a trend towards a relationship between exposure and knowledge of Kids Help Line.
CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Although effect size was small, the results suggest that the advertising campaign had a modest but potentially important impact.
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2006 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 16:48:14 EST