Do rural consumers expect a prescription from their GP visit? Investigation of patients' expectations for a prescription and doctors' prescribing decisions in rural Australia

Cutts, C. and Tett, S.E. (2005) Do rural consumers expect a prescription from their GP visit? Investigation of patients' expectations for a prescription and doctors' prescribing decisions in rural Australia. Australian Journal of Rural Health, 13 1: 43-50. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1854.2004.00644.x


Author Cutts, C.
Tett, S.E.
Title Do rural consumers expect a prescription from their GP visit? Investigation of patients' expectations for a prescription and doctors' prescribing decisions in rural Australia
Journal name Australian Journal of Rural Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1038-5282
Publication date 2005-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1854.2004.00644.x
Volume 13
Issue 1
Start page 43
End page 50
Total pages 8
Editor D. Hegney
J. Marley
Place of publication Australia
Publisher Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Subject C1
321208 Primary Health Care
730209 Rural health
Abstract Objective: To assess patients’ expectation for receiving a prescription and GPs’ perceptions of patient expectation for a prescription. Design: Matched questionnaire study completed by patients and GPs. Setting: Seven general practices in rural Queensland, Australia. Subjects: The subjects were 481 patients consulting 17 GPs. Main outcome measures: Patients’ expectation for receiving a prescription and GPs’ perceptions of patients’ expectation. Results: Ideal expectation (hope) for a prescription was expressed by 57% (274/481) of patients. Sixty-six per cent (313/481) thought it was likely that the doctor would actually give them a prescription. Doctors accurately predicted hope or lack of hope for a prescription in 65% (314/481) of consultations, but were inaccurate in 19% (93/481). A prescription was written in 55% of consultations. No increase in patients’ expectation, doctors’ perceptions of expectation, or decision to prescribe were detected for patients living a greater distance from the doctors. Conclusions: Rural patients demonstrated similar rates of hope for a prescription to those found in previous urban studies. Rural doctors seem to be similarly ‘accurate’ and ‘inaccurate’ in determining patients’ expectations. Rates of prescribing were comparable to urban rates. Distance was not found to increase the level of patient expectation, affect the doctors’ perception or to influence the decision to prescribe.
Keyword Queensland
Rural
General Practice
Expectations
Survey
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2006 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 16:45:54 EST