Infracommunity structure of parasites of Hemigymnus melapterus (Pisces : Labridae) from Lizard Island, Australia: The importance of habitat and parasite body size

Munoz Cerda, Gabriela and Cribb, Thomas H. (2005) Infracommunity structure of parasites of Hemigymnus melapterus (Pisces : Labridae) from Lizard Island, Australia: The importance of habitat and parasite body size. Journal of Parasitology, 91 1: 38-44. doi:10.1645/GE-3321


Author Munoz Cerda, Gabriela
Cribb, Thomas H.
Title Infracommunity structure of parasites of Hemigymnus melapterus (Pisces : Labridae) from Lizard Island, Australia: The importance of habitat and parasite body size
Journal name Journal of Parasitology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-3395
Publication date 2005-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1645/GE-3321
Volume 91
Issue 1
Start page 38
End page 44
Total pages 7
Place of publication Lawrence
Publisher American Society of Parasitologists
Language eng
Subject C1
270702 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
770302 Living resources (incl. impacts of fishing on non-target species)
Abstract This Study describes the community of all metazoan parasites from 14 individuals of thicklip wrasse, Hemigymnus melapterus, from Lizard Island, Australia. All fish were parasitized, and 4,649 parasite individuals were found. Twenty-six parasite species were identified although only 6 species were abundant and prevalent: gnathiid isopods, the copepod Hatschekia hemigymni, the digenean Callohelmis pichelinae, and 3 morphotypes of tetraphyllidean cestode larvae. We analyzed whether the body size and microhabitat of the parasites and size of the host affected understanding of the structure of the parasite community. We related the abundance, biovolume, and density of parasites with the host body size and analyzed the abundances and volumetric densities of some parasite species within microhabitats. Although the 2 most abundant species comprised 75% of all parasite individuals, 4 species, each in similar proportion, comprised 85% of the total biovolume. Although larger host individuals had higher richness, abundance, and biovolume of parasites than smaller individuals, overall parasite volumetric density actually decreased with the host body size. Moreover. parasites exhibited abundances and densities significantly different among microhabitats; some parasite species depended on the area available, whereas others selected a specific microhabitat. Parasite and habitat size exhibited interesting relationships that should be considered more frequently. Considerations of these parameters improve understanding of parasite community structure and how the parasites use their habitats.
Keyword Parasitology
Energetic Equivalence Rule
Coral-reef Fishes
Helminth Communities
French-polynesia
Gill Parasites
Site Selection
Abundance
Diversity
Host
Ectoparasites
Q-Index Code C1
Additional Notes DOI: 10.1645/GE-3321

 
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