Decreased relatedness between male prickly forest skinks (Gnypetoscincus queenslandiae) in habitat fragments

Sumner, Joanna (2005) Decreased relatedness between male prickly forest skinks (Gnypetoscincus queenslandiae) in habitat fragments. Conservation Genetics, 6 3: 333-340. doi:10.1007/s10592-005-4959-1


Author Sumner, Joanna
Title Decreased relatedness between male prickly forest skinks (Gnypetoscincus queenslandiae) in habitat fragments
Journal name Conservation Genetics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1566-0621
1572-9737
Publication date 2005-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10592-005-4959-1
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 6
Issue 3
Start page 333
End page 340
Total pages 8
Editor A. Rus Hoelzel
Place of publication Dordrecht
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Subject C1
270799 Ecology and Evolution not elsewhere classified
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract In species with low levels of dispersal the chance of closely related individuals breeding may be a potential problem; sex-biased dispersal is a mechanism that may decrease the possibility of cosanguineous mating. Fragmentation of the habitat in which a species lives may affect mechanisms such as sex-biased dispersal, which may in turn exacerbate more direct effects of fragmentation such as decreasing population size that may lead to inbreeding depression. Relatedness statistics calculated using microsatellite DNA data showed that rainforest fragmentation has had an effect on the patterns of dispersal in the prickly forest skink (Gnypetoscincus queenslandiae), a rainforest endemic of the Wet Tropics of north eastern Australia. A lower level of relatedness was found in fragments compared to continuous forest sites due to a significantly lower level of pairwise relatedness between males in rainforest fragments. The pattern of genetic relatedness between sexes indicates the presence of male-biased dispersal in this species, with a stronger pattern detected in populations in rainforest fragments. Male prickly forest skinks may have to move further in fragmented habitat in order to find mates or suitable habitat logs.
Keyword Gnypetoscincus queenslandiae
habitat fragmentation
microsatellite
relatedness
sex-biased dispersal
Arboreal Marsupials
Genetic-markers
Population
Dispersal
Lizard
Metapopulation
Demography
Selection
Gekkonidae
Responses
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 16:03:51 EST