Effects of marine reserve protection on the mud crap Scylla serrata in a sex-biased fishery in subtropical Australia

Pillans, S., Pillans, R. D., Johnstone, R. W., Kraft, P. G., Haywood, M. D. E. and Possingham, Hugh P. (2005) Effects of marine reserve protection on the mud crap Scylla serrata in a sex-biased fishery in subtropical Australia. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 295 201-213. doi:10.3354/meps295201


Author Pillans, S.
Pillans, R. D.
Johnstone, R. W.
Kraft, P. G.
Haywood, M. D. E.
Possingham, Hugh P.
Title Effects of marine reserve protection on the mud crap Scylla serrata in a sex-biased fishery in subtropical Australia
Journal name Marine Ecology Progress Series   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0171-8630
1616-1599
Publication date 2005-06-23
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3354/meps295201
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 295
Start page 201
End page 213
Total pages 13
Editor O. Kinne
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publisher Inter-Research
Collection year 2005
Language eng
Abstract The impact of sex-biased fishing and marine reserve protection on the mud crab Scylla serrata was examined by comparing the catch rates (catch-per-unit-effort, CPUE), mean size, sex ratios and movement of crabs in 2 coastal marine reserves (1.9 and 5.7 km(2)) and 4 fished non-reserve sites in subtropical Australia. Five years after closure, both marine reserves supported higher catch rates and a larger mean size of S. serrata than non-reserve sites. Males dominated catches of S. serrata in both marine reserves, where CPUE was at least twice as high within the reserves compared to non-reserve sites. Male crabs were also 10% larger in the reserves compared to adjacent fished areas, and of the total male catch, over 70% were equal to or greater than legal size compared to less than 50% outside the reserves. The sex ratio of S. serrata was skewed towards females in all nonreserve sites, which was most likely a result of the ban on taking female S. serrata in Moreton Bay. As only male crabs of >= 15 cm CW made up the S. serrata fishery in Moreton Bay, sex ratios of mature male and female crabs were examined, revealing a strong skew (2:1) towards mature males in both marine reserves. Of the 472 S. serrata captured in this study, 338 were tagged in the reserves in order to document movement of the crabs between the reserve and non-reserve sites. Of the 37 recaptured crabs, 73% were recorded inside the reserves, with some spillover (i.e. cross-boundary movement) of crabs recorded in fished areas. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of small (< 6 km(2)) marine reserves for sex-biased exploited fisheries species.
Keyword Ecology
Marine & Freshwater Biology
Oceanography
Marine Reserves
Scylla Serrata
Sex-biased Fishery
Cpue
Sex Ratio
Reserve Size
Subtropical
Australia
Lobster Jasus-edwardsii
Northern New-zealand
Spiny Lobster
Reef Fishes
Central Chile
South-africa
Movement
Size
Management
Abundance
Q-Index Code C1
Additional Notes DOI: 10.3354/meps295201

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 15:24:28 EST