The importance of mating system in translocation programs: reproductive success of released male bridled nailtail wallabies

Sigg, D. P., Goldizen, A. W. and Pople, A. R. (2005) The importance of mating system in translocation programs: reproductive success of released male bridled nailtail wallabies. Biological Conservation, 123 3: 289-300. doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2004.11.017


Author Sigg, D. P.
Goldizen, A. W.
Pople, A. R.
Title The importance of mating system in translocation programs: reproductive success of released male bridled nailtail wallabies
Journal name Biological Conservation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0006-3207
Publication date 2005-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.biocon.2004.11.017
Volume 123
Issue 3
Start page 289
End page 300
Total pages 12
Editor R. Marrs
Place of publication Essex
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject C1
270708 Conservation and Biodiversity
770703 Living resources (flora and fauna)
Abstract Translocation is an important tool for the conservation of species that have suffered severe range reductions. The success of a translocation should be measured not only by the survival of released animals, but by the reproductive output of individuals and hence the establishment of a self-sustaining population. The bridled nailtail wallaby is an endangered Australian macropod that suffered an extensive range contraction to a single remaining wild population. A translocated population was established and subsequently monitored over a four year period. The aim of this study was to measure the reproductive success of released males using genetic tools and to determine the factors that predicted reproductive success. Captive-bred and wild-caught animals were released and we found significant variation in male reproductive success among release groups. Variation in reproductive success was best explained by individual male weight, survival and release location rather than origin. Only 26% of candidate males were observed to sire an offspring during the study. The bridled nailtail wallaby is a sexually dimorphic, polygynous macropod and reproductive success is skewed toward large males. Males over 5800 g were six times more likely to sire an offspring than males below this weight. This study highlights the importance of considering mating system when choosing animals for translocation. Translocation programs for polygynous species should release a greater proportion of females, and only release males of high breeding potential. By maximizing the reproductive output of released animals, conservation managers will reduce the costs of translocation and increase the chance of successfully establishing a self-sustaining population. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Biodiversity Conservation
Ecology
Environmental Sciences
Translocation
Paternity
Mating System
Microsatellites
Onychogalea Fraenata
Fraenata Gould Marsupialia
Genetic Diversity
Body-size
Reintroduction
Australia
Macropodidae
Conservation
Demography
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 15:21:34 EST