Genetic variance in female condition predicts indirect genetic variance in male sexual display traits

Petfield, Donna, Chenoweth, Stephen F., Rundle, Howard D. and Blows, Mark W. (2005) Genetic variance in female condition predicts indirect genetic variance in male sexual display traits. Proceedings of The National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 102 17: 6045-6050. doi:10.1073/pnas.0409378102


Author Petfield, Donna
Chenoweth, Stephen F.
Rundle, Howard D.
Blows, Mark W.
Title Genetic variance in female condition predicts indirect genetic variance in male sexual display traits
Journal name Proceedings of The National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0027-8424
1091-6490
Publication date 2005-04-26
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0409378102
Volume 102
Issue 17
Start page 6045
End page 6050
Total pages 6
Place of publication Washington, D.C.
Publisher National Academy of Sciences of the U.S.
Language eng
Subject C1
270207 Quantitative Genetics
060412 Quantitative Genetics (incl. Disease and Trait Mapping Genetics)
06 Biological Sciences
Formatted abstract
During sexual encounters, individuals often use signals, such as display traits, to attract mates. if individuals alter their display traits with respect to the genotype of potential mates, indirect genetic effects (IGEs) may occur in which the genes of one individual influence the phenotype of another. Although IGEs between related individuals have received much attention, their occurrence between unrelated individuals during sexual encounters has not. Here, we demonstrate that in the Australian fruit fly Drosophila serrata, males assess females by using both visual and olfactory cues, resulting in a rapid plastic response (within minutes) in male cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), a display trait that is an important target of mate choice. Several CHCs in males exhibited significant IGEs, and IGEs were inducible on both males reared in the laboratory and on field-caught individuals. A vector describing genetic variance in multiple CHCs in females was found to be almost identical to a vector describing indirect genetic variance in male CHCs, suggesting that males might assess female CHCs during courtship. This vector displayed contributions from all female CHCs in the same direction and of similar magnitude, suggesting that female condition may be the underlying casual trait that males are assessing. Consistent with this interpretation, when measured directly in a separate experiment, genetic variance in female condition accounted for 19.8% of the indirect genetic variance in male CHCs. These indirect genetic effects have the potential to alter the response to selection of male sexual display traits.
Keyword Cuticular Hydrocarbons
Indirect Genetic Effect
Social Interaction
Drosophila-melanogaster
Phenotypic Plasticity
Mate Recognition
Interacting Phenotypes
Quantitative Genetics
Natural-population
Social-environment
Onthophagus-taurus
Field Conditions
Lek Paradox
Signal traits
Drosophila serrata
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 15:21:23 EST