Familial influence on offspring gambling: a cognitive mechanism for transmission of gambling behavior in families

Oei, T. P. S. and Raylu, N. (2004) Familial influence on offspring gambling: a cognitive mechanism for transmission of gambling behavior in families. Psychological Medicine, 34 7: 1279-1288. doi:10.1017/S0033291704003150


Author Oei, T. P. S.
Raylu, N.
Title Familial influence on offspring gambling: a cognitive mechanism for transmission of gambling behavior in families
Journal name Psychological Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0033-2917
Publication date 2004-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0033291704003150
Open Access Status
Volume 34
Issue 7
Start page 1279
End page 1288
Total pages 10
Editor E. Paykel
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Subject C1
380105 Social and Community Psychology
780108 Behavioural and cognitive sciences
Abstract Background. The problem-gambling literature has identified a range of individual, cognitive, behavioral and emotional factors as playing important roles in the development, maintenance and treatment of problem gambling. However, familial factors have often been neglected. The current study aims to investigate the possible influence of parental factors on offspring gambling behavior. Method. A total of 189 families (546 individuals) completed several questionnaires including the South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS) and the Gambling Related Cognition Scale (GRCS). The relationships were examined using Pearson product-moment correlations and structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses. Results. Results showed that generally parents' (especially fathers') gambling cognitions and gambling behaviors positively correlated with offspring gambling behaviors and cognitions. However, SEM analyses showed that although parental gambling behavior was directly related to offspring gambling behavior, parental cognitions were not related to offspring gambling behavior directly but indirectly via offspring cognitions. Conclusion. The findings show that the influence of parental gambling cognition on offspring gambling behavior is indirect and via offspring cognitions. The results suggest a possible cognitive mechanism of transmission of gambling behavior in the family from one generation to the next.
Keyword Psychiatry
Psychology
Psychology, Clinical
Refusal Self-efficacy
Alcohol Expectancies
Pathological Gamblers
Differential Role
Fit Indexes
Drinking
Children
Association
Adolescents
Prevention
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 15:19:16 EST