Genetic influences on cognitive processes associated with distraction: An event-related potential study of the slow wave

Hansell, Narelle K., Wright, Margaret J., Geffen, Gina M., Geffen, Laurie B. and Martin, Nicholas G. (2004) Genetic influences on cognitive processes associated with distraction: An event-related potential study of the slow wave. Australian Journal of Psychology, 56 2: 89-98. doi:10.1080/0049530410001734856


Author Hansell, Narelle K.
Wright, Margaret J.
Geffen, Gina M.
Geffen, Laurie B.
Martin, Nicholas G.
Title Genetic influences on cognitive processes associated with distraction: An event-related potential study of the slow wave
Journal name Australian Journal of Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-9530
1742-9536
0572-1172
Publication date 2004-09-01
Year available 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/0049530410001734856
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 56
Issue 2
Start page 89
End page 98
Total pages 10
Editor M. Innes
Place of publication Basingstoke, U.K.
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Subject C1
380102 Learning, Memory, Cognition and Language
780108 Behavioural and cognitive sciences
1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Sciences
Abstract The efficiency of inhibitory control processes has been proposed as a mechanism constraining working-memory capacity. In order to investigate genetic influences on processes that may reflect interference control, event-related potential (ER-P) activity recorded at frontal sites, during distracting and nondistracting conditions of a working-memory task, in a sample of 509 twin pairs was examined. The ERP component of interest was the slow wave (SW). Considerable overlap in source of genetic influence was found, with a common genetic factor accounting for 37 - 45% of SW variance irrespective of condition. However, 3 - 8 % of SW variance in the distracting condition was influenced by an independent genetic source. These results suggest that neural responses to irrelevant and distracting information, that may disrupt working-memory performance, differ in a fundamental way from perceptual and memory-based processing in a working-memory task. Furthermore, the results are consistent with the view that cognition is a complex genetic trait influenced by numerous genes of small influence.
Keyword Psychology, Multidisciplinary
Short-term-memory
Working-memory
Cortex
Task
Performance
Stimuli
Q-Index Code C1
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 14:44:07 EST