Variation in perception of environmental change in nine Solomon Islands communities: implications for securing fairness in community-based adaptation

Ensor, Jonathan Edward, Abernethy, Kirsten Elizabeth, Hoddy, Eric Timothy, Aswani, Shankar, Albert, Simon, Vaccaro, Ismael, Benedict, Jason Jon and Beare, Douglas James (2017) Variation in perception of environmental change in nine Solomon Islands communities: implications for securing fairness in community-based adaptation. Regional Environmental Change, 18 4: 1131-1143. doi:10.1007/s10113-017-1242-1


Author Ensor, Jonathan Edward
Abernethy, Kirsten Elizabeth
Hoddy, Eric Timothy
Aswani, Shankar
Albert, Simon
Vaccaro, Ismael
Benedict, Jason Jon
Beare, Douglas James
Title Variation in perception of environmental change in nine Solomon Islands communities: implications for securing fairness in community-based adaptation
Journal name Regional Environmental Change   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1436-378X
1436-3798
Publication date 2017-11-18
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10113-017-1242-1
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 18
Issue 4
Start page 1131
End page 1143
Total pages 13
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer Verlag
Language eng
Subject 2306 Global and Planetary Change
Abstract Community-based approaches are pursued in recognition of the need for place-based responses to environmental change that integrate local understandings of risk and vulnerability. Yet the potential for fair adaptation is intimately linked to how variations in perceptions of environmental change and risk are treated. There is, however, little empirical evidence of the extent and nature of variations in risk perception in and between multiple community settings. Here, we rely on data from 231 semi-structured interviews conducted in nine communities in Western Province, Solomon Islands, to statistically model different perceptions of risk and change within and between communities. Overall, people were found to be less likely to perceive environmental changes in the marine environment than they were for terrestrial systems. The distance to the nearest market town (which may be a proxy for exposure to commercial logging and degree of involvement with the market economy), and gender had the greatest overall statistical effects on perceptions of risk. Yet, we also find that significant environmental change is underreported in communities, while variations in perception are not always easily related to commonly assumed fault lines of vulnerability. The findings suggest that there is an urgent need for methods that engage with the drivers of perceptions as part of community-based approaches. In particular, it is important to explicitly account for place, complexity and diversity of environmental risk perceptions, and we reinforce calls to engage seriously with underlying questions of power, culture, identity and practice that influence adaptive capacity and risk perception.
Keyword Adaptation
Climate change
Community-based adaptation
Fairness
Risk perception
Solomon Islands
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID GF160008
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Civil Engineering Publications
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Created: Fri, 13 Apr 2018, 09:26:58 EST