Psychosocial factors associated with intended use of automated vehicles: a simulated driving study

Buckley, Lisa, Kaye, Sherrie-Anne and Pradhan, Anuj K. (2018) Psychosocial factors associated with intended use of automated vehicles: a simulated driving study. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 115 202-208. doi:10.1016/j.aap.2018.03.021


Author Buckley, Lisa
Kaye, Sherrie-Anne
Pradhan, Anuj K.
Title Psychosocial factors associated with intended use of automated vehicles: a simulated driving study
Journal name Accident Analysis & Prevention   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1879-2057
0001-4575
Publication date 2018-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.aap.2018.03.021
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 115
Start page 202
End page 208
Total pages 7
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 3307 Human Factors and Ergonomics
2213 Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
3308 Law
Abstract This study applied the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to assess drivers' intended use of automated vehicles (AVs) after undertaking a simulated driving task. In addition, this study explored the potential for trust to account for additional variance to the psychosocial factors in TPB and TAM. Seventy-four participants (51% female) aged between 25 and 64 years (M = 42.8, SD = 12.9) undertook a 20 min simulated experimental drive in which participants experienced periods of automated driving and manual control. A survey task followed. A hierarchical regression analysis revealed that TPB constructs; attitude toward the behavior, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control, were significant predictors of intentions to use AV. In addition, there was partial support for the test of TAM, with ease of use (but not usefulness) predicting intended use of AV (SAE Level 3). Trust contributed variance to both models beyond TPB or TAM constructs. The findings provide an important insight into factors that might reflect intended use of vehicles that are primarily automated (longitudinal, lateral, and manoeuvre controls) but require and allow drivers to have periods of manual control.
Formatted abstract
This study applied the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to assess drivers' intended use of automated vehicles (AVs) after undertaking a simulated driving task. In addition, this study explored the potential for trust to account for additional variance to the psychosocial factors in TPB and TAM. Seventy-four participants (51% female) aged between 25 and 64 years (M = 42.8, SD = 12.9) undertook a 20 min simulated experimental drive in which participants experienced periods of automated driving and manual control. A survey task followed. A hierarchical regression analysis revealed that TPB constructs; attitude toward the behavior, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control, were significant predictors of intentions to use AV. In addition, there was partial support for the test of TAM, with ease of use (but not usefulness) predicting intended use of AV (SAE Level 3). Trust contributed variance to both models beyond TPB or TAM constructs. The findings provide an important insight into factors that might reflect intended use of vehicles that are primarily automated (longitudinal, lateral, and manoeuvre controls) but require and allow drivers to have periods of manual control.
Keyword Automated vehicles
Driving simulator
Technology Acceptance Model
Theory of Planned Behavior
Trust in automation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 11 Apr 2018, 10:00:33 EST