Longevity, growth and community ecology of invasive Poa annua across environmental gradients in the subantarctic

Williams, Laura K., Shaw, Justine D., Sindel, Brian M., Wilson, Susan C. and Kristiansen, Paul (2018) Longevity, growth and community ecology of invasive Poa annua across environmental gradients in the subantarctic. Basic and Applied Ecology, . doi:10.1016/j.baae.2018.02.003


Author Williams, Laura K.
Shaw, Justine D.
Sindel, Brian M.
Wilson, Susan C.
Kristiansen, Paul
Title Longevity, growth and community ecology of invasive Poa annua across environmental gradients in the subantarctic
Journal name Basic and Applied Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1618-0089
1439-1791
Publication date 2018-02-20
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.baae.2018.02.003
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Total pages 12
Place of publication Muenchen, Germany
Publisher Elsevier GmbH
Language eng
Subject 1105 Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Abstract Poa annua is a cosmopolitan weed in turf grass. It is a widespread non-native species in the subantarctic and also occurs in the Antarctic Peninsula. It has highly variable morphology, longevity and reproductive capacity across both its invaded and native range. Little is known about the ecology of P. annua in the subantarctic, particularly its longevity, morphological variation across small spatial scales and competitive ability. We monitored individual P. annua plants on subantarctic Macquarie Island to assess their longevity; quantified morphology and biomass allocation across environmental gradients; and assessed community diversity indices in areas of varying P. annua density. We show that P. annua plants on Macquarie Island are perennial, and their morphology varies with elevation, animal disturbance and soil properties. At low altitude, coastal sites with high animal disturbance and deep, sandy soils, P. annua plants are larger and native plant diversity is low. Conversely, at high altitude sites P. annua plants are smaller and the diversity of native species is not reduced. This new information informs why P. annua is the most successful plant invader in the subantarctic and quantifies some key characteristics enabling an invasive species to function well beyond its natural range. Community ecology theory can also explain patterns in the ecology of P. annua on Macquarie Island.
Keyword Alien
Antarctic region
Perenniality
Weed
Wintergrass
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 29 Mar 2018, 21:24:42 EST