A systematic review of associations of physical activity and sedentary time with asthma outcomes

Cordova-Rivera, Laura, Gibson, Peter G., Gardiner, Paul A. and McDonald, Vanessa M (2018) A systematic review of associations of physical activity and sedentary time with asthma outcomes. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, . doi:10.1016/j.jaip.2018.02.027


Author Cordova-Rivera, Laura
Gibson, Peter G.
Gardiner, Paul A.
McDonald, Vanessa M
Title A systematic review of associations of physical activity and sedentary time with asthma outcomes
Journal name The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice
ISSN 2213-2201
2213-2198
Publication date 2018-03-03
Year available 2018
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jaip.2018.02.027
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Total pages 16
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 2723 Immunology and Allergy
Abstract Physical inactivity and high sedentary time are associated with adverse health outcomes in several diseases. However, their impact in asthma is less clear.

We aimed to synthesise the literature characterising physical activity and sedentary time in adults with asthma, to estimate activity levels using meta-analysis, and to evaluate associations between physical activity and sedentary time and the clinical and physiological characteristics of asthma.

Articles written in English and addressing the measurement of physical activity or sedentary time in adults ≥18 years old with asthma were identified using four electronic databases. Meta-analysis was used to estimate steps/day in applicable studies.

There were 42 studies that met the inclusion criteria. Physical activity in asthma was lower compared to controls. The pooled mean (95%CI) steps/day for people with asthma was 8390 (7361, 9419). Physical activity tended to be lower in females compared with males, and in older people with asthma compared with their younger counterparts. Higher levels of physical activity were associated with better measures of lung function, disease control, health status, and health care use. Measures of sedentary time were scarce, and indicated a similar engagement in this behavior between asthma participants and controls. High sedentary time was associated with higher health care use, and poorer lung function, asthma control and exercise capacity.

People with asthma engage in lower levels of physical activity compared to controls. Higher levels of physical activity may positively impact on asthma clinical outcomes. Sedentary time should be more widely assessed.
Keyword Accelerometry
Associations
Asthma
Clinical outcomes
Meta-analysis
Physical activity
Questionnaire
Sedentary time
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Mater Research Institute-UQ (MRI-UQ)
UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
HERDC Pre-Audit
Faculty of Medicine
 
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Created: Wed, 14 Mar 2018, 10:07:15 EST