Junk food advertising moderates the indirect effect of reward sensitivity and food consumption via the urge to eat

Kidd, Chloe and Loxton, Natalie J. (2018) Junk food advertising moderates the indirect effect of reward sensitivity and food consumption via the urge to eat. Physiology and Behavior, 188 276-282. doi:10.1016/j.physbeh.2018.02.030

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Author Kidd, Chloe
Loxton, Natalie J.
Title Junk food advertising moderates the indirect effect of reward sensitivity and food consumption via the urge to eat
Journal name Physiology and Behavior   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-507X
0031-9384
Publication date 2018-05-01
Year available 2018
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.physbeh.2018.02.030
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 188
Start page 276
End page 282
Total pages 7
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract The current study aimed to identify how underlying individual differences increases vulnerability to television food advertising. In particular, this study examined how reward sensitivity, a biologically-based predisposition to approach rewards (such as appetitive foods) in the environment, influenced participants' vulnerability to television food advertising and subsequent food consumption. Ninety-eight participants were randomly assigned to a cue condition (food cues versus non-food cues) and then viewed a 30 min documentary interrupted by advertising featuring a mix of food and neutral advertising (food cue condition) or only neutral advertising (non-food cue condition). Participants' reward sensitivity, approach motivation measured as urge to eat, and food consumption were recorded. Moderated mediation regression analyses revealed the positive association between reward sensitivity and food consumption was mediated by an increase in urge to eat, but only when participants were exposed to food advertising. These findings suggest heightened reward sensitivity, exposure to appetitive food cues, and approach motivation are key interacting mechanisms that may lead to maladaptive eating behaviours.
Keyword Advertising
Cue
Food
Personality
Reward
Television
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Centre for Youth Substance Abuse Research Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 21 Feb 2018, 11:00:52 EST