Dissociating neural variability related to stimulus quality and response times in perceptual decision-making

Bode, Stefan, Bennett, Daniel, Sewell, David K., Paton, Bryan, Egan, Gary F., Smith, Philip L. and Murawski, Carsten (2018) Dissociating neural variability related to stimulus quality and response times in perceptual decision-making. Neuropsychologia, 111 190-200. doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.01.040


Author Bode, Stefan
Bennett, Daniel
Sewell, David K.
Paton, Bryan
Egan, Gary F.
Smith, Philip L.
Murawski, Carsten
Title Dissociating neural variability related to stimulus quality and response times in perceptual decision-making
Journal name Neuropsychologia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-3514
0028-3932
Publication date 2018-02-01
Year available 2018
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.01.040
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 111
Start page 190
End page 200
Total pages 11
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Language eng
Subject 3205 Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
2805 Cognitive Neuroscience
2802 Behavioral Neuroscience
Abstract According to sequential sampling models, perceptual decision-making is based on accumulation of noisy evidence towards a decision threshold. The speed with which a decision is reached is determined by both the quality of incoming sensory information and random trial-by-trial variability in the encoded stimulus representations. To investigate those decision dynamics at the neural level, participants made perceptual decisions while functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was conducted. On each trial, participants judged whether an image presented under conditions of high, medium, or low visual noise showed a piano or a chair. Higher stimulus quality (lower visual noise) was associated with increased activation in bilateral medial occipito-temporal cortex and ventral striatum. Lower stimulus quality was related to stronger activation in posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). When stimulus quality was fixed, faster response times were associated with a positive parametric modulation of activation in medial prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex, while slower response times were again related to more activation in PPC, DLPFC and insula. Our results suggest that distinct neural networks were sensitive to the quality of stimulus information, and to trial-to-trial variability in the encoded stimulus representations, but that reaching a decision was a consequence of their joint activity.
Keyword Decision difficulty
Evidence accumulation
Functional magnetic resonance imaging
Perceptual decision-making
Sequential sampling models
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID DE140100350
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 14 Feb 2018, 11:09:15 EST