Identifying characteristics and practices of multidisciplinary team reviews for patients with severe mental illness: a systematic review

Woody, Charlotte A., Baxter, Amanda J., Harris, Meredith G., Siskind, Dan J. and Whiteford, Harvey A. (2018) Identifying characteristics and practices of multidisciplinary team reviews for patients with severe mental illness: a systematic review. Australasian Psychiatry, 1039856217751783. doi:10.1177/1039856217751783


Author Woody, Charlotte A.
Baxter, Amanda J.
Harris, Meredith G.
Siskind, Dan J.
Whiteford, Harvey A.
Title Identifying characteristics and practices of multidisciplinary team reviews for patients with severe mental illness: a systematic review
Journal name Australasian Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1440-1665
1039-8562
Publication date 2018-02-01
Year available 2018
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1039856217751783
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Start page 1039856217751783
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Abstract Multidisciplinary teams in mental health receive limited guidance, leading to inconsistent practices. We undertook a systematic review of the characteristics and practices of multidisciplinary team reviews for patients with severe mental illness or in relevant mental health service settings.

Sources published since 2000 were located via academic database and web searches. Results were synthesised narratively.

A total of 14 sources were analysed. Important characteristics and practices identified included routine monitoring and evaluation, good communication, equality between team members, and clear documentation practices. Success factors included defined leadership and clear team goals. Four sources described considerations for patients with complex clinical needs, including allocating sufficient time for discussion, maintaining connections with community providers, and ensuring culturally sensitive practices.

No single best practice model was found, due to variations in team caseload, casemix, and resourcing levels. However, key ingredients for success were proposed. Sources were mostly descriptive; there remains a lack of evidence-based guidance regarding multidisciplinary team review characteristics and practices.
Keyword Case review
Mental health
Multidisciplinary team
Systematic review
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 14 Feb 2018, 11:05:51 EST