First observations on the life cycle and mass eclosion events in a mantis fly (Family Mantispidae) in the subfamily Drepanicinae

Dorey, James B. and Merritt, David J. (2017) First observations on the life cycle and mass eclosion events in a mantis fly (Family Mantispidae) in the subfamily Drepanicinae. Biodiversity Data Journal, 5 5: 1-12. doi:10.3897/BDJ.5.e21206


Author Dorey, James B.
Merritt, David J.
Title First observations on the life cycle and mass eclosion events in a mantis fly (Family Mantispidae) in the subfamily Drepanicinae
Journal name Biodiversity Data Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1314-2828
1314-2836
Publication date 2017-11-22
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3897/BDJ.5.e21206
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 5
Issue 5
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Place of publication Sofia, Bulgaria
Publisher Pensoft Publishers
Abstract The Mantispidae are a distinctive group of Neuroptera known for the adults' possession of raptorial forelegs. There are four recognised, extant subfamilies of Mantispidae: the Mantispinae, Symphrasinae, Calomantispinae and Drepanicinae. The life history and larval behaviour of the subfamily Mantispinae is best known: the immatures are spider egg predators. Among the three remaining subfamilies, larval Symphrasinae and Calomantispinae most likely predate on other small arthropods, while the immature life history of Drepanicinae, until now, remained completely unknown.

Here we provide observations of annual, near-synchronised, mass emergences of adults of the drepanicine, Ditaxis biseriata (Westwood), within a well-established Macadamia orchard in northern New South Wales, Australia. A female deposited fertile eggs, allowing this first report of egg batch and first instar morphology. The mass emergence of mobile pharate adults from the ground was observed in the same month in two consecutive years. The pharates climbed tree-trunks for a distance before undergoing eclosion. The newly-hatched first instar larvae are campodeiform and prognathous; a typical morphology among Mantispidae. After hatching, they drop to the ground and burrow into soil. They are unpigmented and appear to lack stemmata. Together, the observations infer that the immature component of the life cycle takes place underground in forested habitats. If this feature is common among the Drepanicinae, it might explain why so little is known of the biology of the immature stages.
Keyword Drepanicinae
Mantispidae
campodeiform larvae
mantis flies
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 10 Jan 2018, 12:04:01 EST