Goal-directed occupational therapy for children with unilateral cerebral palsy: categorising and quantifying session content

Branjerdporn, Nataya, Ziviani, Jenny and Sakzewski, Leanne (2017) Goal-directed occupational therapy for children with unilateral cerebral palsy: categorising and quantifying session content. British Journal of Occupational Therapy, . doi:10.1177/0308022617743458

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Branjerdporn, Nataya
Ziviani, Jenny
Sakzewski, Leanne
Title Goal-directed occupational therapy for children with unilateral cerebral palsy: categorising and quantifying session content
Journal name British Journal of Occupational Therapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0308-0226
1477-6006
Publication date 2017-12-21
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0308022617743458
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Introduction
There is strong evidence that goal-directed occupational therapy achieves improvements in motor and self-care outcomes for children with unilateral cerebral palsy. This pilot study aimed to describe collaborative goals set in occupational therapy sessions, develop categories to describe session content and determine the percentage of in-session time spent addressing goal practice for children with unilateral cerebral palsy.

Method
Videos of 10 therapy sessions with 10 unique child–therapist dyads were analysed. Session content was categorised into goal practice (goal-directed therapy, meaningful goal-supporting activity) and other activity (non-goal-related, child engagement and behavioural support, parent engagement, transition). Descriptive statistics determined the percentage of in-session time spent in goal practice.

Results
Forty-three goals were set and 41 (95%) were activity focused. Mean percentage of time spent in-session on goal practice was 47.5% (SD 31.1%, range 0%–88.1%). Child behavioural support (4.9%), engaging parents (3.2%), transitioning between activities (6.7%) and non-goal-related activity (45.3%) comprised the remaining session time.

Conclusion
Less than half of session time was spent in goal practice, despite being conducted under a goal-directed framework. Non-goal-related activities comprised nearly half of in-session time. Therapists need to consider how to maximise time spent in goal practice during therapy sessions.
Keyword Therapy content
Occupational therapy
Children
Rehabilitation
Cerebral palsy
Goal-directed training
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Faculty of Medicine
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 08 Jan 2018, 10:55:03 EST by Ms Leanne Sakzewski on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences