Do People With Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Benefit From Making Errors? A Randomized Controlled Trial of Error-Based and Errorless Learning

Ownsworth, Tamara, Fleming, Jennifer, Tate, Robyn, Beadle, Elizabeth, Griffin, Janelle, Kendall, Melissa, Schmidt, Julia, Lane-Brown, Amanda, Chevignard, Mathilde and Shum, David H. K. (2017) Do People With Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Benefit From Making Errors? A Randomized Controlled Trial of Error-Based and Errorless Learning. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 31 12: 1072-1082. doi:10.1177/1545968317740635


Author Ownsworth, Tamara
Fleming, Jennifer
Tate, Robyn
Beadle, Elizabeth
Griffin, Janelle
Kendall, Melissa
Schmidt, Julia
Lane-Brown, Amanda
Chevignard, Mathilde
Shum, David H. K.
Title Do People With Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Benefit From Making Errors? A Randomized Controlled Trial of Error-Based and Errorless Learning
Journal name Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1545-9683
1552-6844
Publication date 2017-11-15
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1545968317740635
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 31
Issue 12
Start page 1072
End page 1082
Total pages 11
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, United States
Publisher SAGE PUBLICATIONS
Language eng
Subject 2742 Rehabilitation
2808 Neurology
2728 Clinical Neurology
Abstract Background. Errorless learning (ELL) and error-based learning (EBL) are commonly used approaches to rehabilitation for people with traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, it is unknown whether making errors is beneficial in the learning process to promote skills generalization after severe TBI. Objective. To compare the efficacy of ELL and EBL for improving skills generalization, self-awareness, behavioral competency, and psychosocial functioning after severe TBI. Method. A total of 54 adults (79% male; mean age = 38.0 years, SD = 13.4) with severe TBI were randomly allocated to ELL or EBL and received 8 x 1.5-hour therapy sessions that involved meal preparation and other goal-directed activities. The primary outcome was total errors on the Cooking Task (near-transfer). Secondary outcome measures included the Zoo Map Test (far-transfer), Awareness Questionnaire, Patient Competency Rating Scale, Sydney Psychosocial Reintegration Scale, and Care and Needs Scale. Results. Controlling for baseline performance and years of education, participants in the EBL group made significantly fewer errors at postintervention (mean = 36.25; 95% CI = 32.5-40.0) than ELL participants (mean = 42.57; 95% CI = 38.8-46.3). EBL participants also demonstrated greater self-awareness and behavioral competency at postintervention than ELL participants (P < .05). There were no significant differences on other secondary outcomes (P > .05), or at the 6-month follow-up assessment. Conclusion. EBL was found to be more effective than ELL for enhancing skills generalization on a task related to training and improving self-awareness and behavioral competency.
Keyword Impaired Self-Awareness
Assessing Support Needs
Incog Recommendations
Metacognitive Skills
Executive Function
Cooking Task
Memory
Management
Scale
Rehabilitation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID APP1043677
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 30 Dec 2017, 23:11:04 EST