Glasshouse studies of inherent root growth of seedling avocado rootstock cultivars

Neilsen, M. J., Drenth, A., Dann, E. K. and Campbell, P. R. (2017). Glasshouse studies of inherent root growth of seedling avocado rootstock cultivars. In: S. K. Mitra and R. Nissen, XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC2014): International Symposium on Tropical Fruits, Brisbane, Australia , (35-40). 25 November 2017. doi:10.17660/ActaHortic.2017.1178.6


Author Neilsen, M. J.
Drenth, A.
Dann, E. K.
Campbell, P. R.
Title of paper Glasshouse studies of inherent root growth of seedling avocado rootstock cultivars
Conference name XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC2014): International Symposium on Tropical Fruits
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 25 November 2017
Convener R. Nissen
Journal name Acta Horticulturae   Check publisher's open access policy
Series Acta Horticulturae
Place of Publication Leuven, Belgium
Publisher International Society for Horticultural Science
Publication Year 2017
Year available 2017
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.17660/ActaHortic.2017.1178.6
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
ISBN 9789462611740
ISSN 0567-7572
Editor S. K. Mitra
R. Nissen
Volume 1178
Start page 35
End page 40
Total pages 6
Language eng
Abstract/Summary In order to mimic loss of root function caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi, differences in inherent root growth of avocado seedlings of ten different rootstock cultivars across the three ecological races were investigated. A 2-pot root harvesting system was used and roots were harvested at three different intervals to assess tolerance to root removal. Seedling 'Velvick' produced the largest amount of harvested roots. However, when results were standardised by the total area of mature leaves, there were no significant differences found between rootstock cultivars in cumulative, root growth. Relative to total photosynthetic area, cultivars 'Kidd' and 'Fuerte' (produced the most roots in the absence of root trimming. Overall, increased trimming decreased cumulative root output (P<0.001). For root growth of harvested roots, significant interactions were observed between cultivars and trimming treatment, with the cultivar 'A10' best able to withstand regular mechanical root removal. Significant interactions were also observed between cultivars and trimming treatment for the parameter of root diameter. Most cultivars generally produced thicker roots over time, except for varieties 'Reed' and 'Velvick', for which the average thickest roots were the youngest. Regressing dry weight of harvested roots with projected area in root images, 'Velvick' seedlings had the steepest relationship while 'Edranol' roots had the flattest.
Formatted Abstract/Summary
In order to mimic loss of root function caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi, differences in inherent root growth of avocado seedlings of ten different rootstock cultivars across the three ecological races were investigated. A 2-pot root harvesting system was used and roots were harvested at three different intervals to assess tolerance to root removal. Seedling 'Velvick' produced the largest amount of harvested roots. However, when results were standardised by the total area of mature leaves, there were no significant differences found between rootstock cultivars in cumulative, root growth. Relative to total photosynthetic area, cultivars 'Kidd' and 'Fuerte' (produced the most roots in the absence of root trimming. Overall, increased trimming decreased cumulative root output (P<0.001). For root growth of harvested roots, significant interactions were observed between cultivars and trimming treatment, with the cultivar 'A10' best able to withstand regular mechanical root removal. Significant interactions were also observed between cultivars and trimming treatment for the parameter of root diameter. Most cultivars generally produced thicker roots over time, except for varieties 'Reed' and 'Velvick', for which the average thickest roots were the youngest. Regressing dry weight of harvested roots with projected area in root images, 'Velvick' seedlings had the steepest relationship while 'Edranol' roots had the flattest.
Subjects 1108 Horticulture
Keyword Persea americana
Physiology
Phytophthora root rot
Resistance
Tolerance
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Sub-type: Fully published paper
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
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Created: Sun, 24 Dec 2017, 01:56:12 EST