Role of a mixed type, moderate intensity exercise programme after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

Hayes, S.C., Davies, P.S., Parker, T.W., Bashford, J. and Green, A. (2004) Role of a mixed type, moderate intensity exercise programme after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 38 3: 304-309. doi:10.1136/bjsm.2002.003632


Author Hayes, S.C.
Davies, P.S.
Parker, T.W.
Bashford, J.
Green, A.
Title Role of a mixed type, moderate intensity exercise programme after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation
Journal name British Journal of Sports Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0306-3674
Publication date 2004-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/bjsm.2002.003632
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 38
Issue 3
Start page 304
End page 309
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Language eng
Subject C1
321019 Paediatrics
730204 Child health
11 Medical and Health Sciences
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
110602 Exercise Physiology
Formatted abstract
Objectives:
To evaluate the effect of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation on functional capacity, and to determine the role of a mixed type, moderate intensity exercise programme in the recovery of patients after intensive cancer treatment.

Methods:
Peak aerobic capacity and muscular strength (upper body, lower body, and handgrip strength) measures were assessed before (PI) and after (PII) transplant and after a 12 week intervention period (PIII). After PII, 12 patients aged 16–64 years were allotted in equal numbers to a control group or exercise intervention group.

Results:
Mean peak aerobic capacity and muscular strength were reduced after the transplant, with significant (p<0.05) decreases for upper body strength. No change was found in aerobic capacity and muscular strength between PII and PIII for the control group. In contrast, participation in the exercise programme led to significant improvements in peak aerobic capacity (p<0.05) and upper and lower body strength (p<0.01). In addition, values recorded after the three month intervention period were significantly higher than before treatment for peak aerobic capacity (litres/min (p<0.05) and ml/kg/min (p<0.01)) and lower body strength (p<0.01).

Conclusion:

Intensive treatment for cancer can adversely affect aerobic capacity and muscular strength. A mixed type, moderate intensity exercise programme can help patients to regain fitness and strength within three months. No exercise can exacerbate physical losses resulting from treatment.
Keyword Sport Sciences
Bone-marrow-transplantation
Quality-of-life
Cancer-patients
Aerobic Exercise
Performance
Rehabilitation
Chemotherapy
Leukemia
Fatigue
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 13:44:29 EST