Diversification economies and specialisation efficiencies in a mixed food and coffee smallholder farming system in Papua New Guinea

Coelli, Tim and Fleming, Euan (2004) Diversification economies and specialisation efficiencies in a mixed food and coffee smallholder farming system in Papua New Guinea. Agricultural Economics, 31 2-3: 229-239. doi:10.1016/j.agecon.2004.09.010


Author Coelli, Tim
Fleming, Euan
Title Diversification economies and specialisation efficiencies in a mixed food and coffee smallholder farming system in Papua New Guinea
Journal name Agricultural Economics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0169-5150
1574-0862
Publication date 2004-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.agecon.2004.09.010
Volume 31
Issue 2-3
Start page 229
End page 239
Total pages 11
Editor G. Norton
S. von Cramon-Taubadel
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject C1
340201 Agricultural Economics
340202 Environment and Resource Economics
340404 Cross-Sectional Analysis
720205 Industry costs and structure
720404 Productivity
Abstract Smallholder farming systems in Papua New Guinea are characterised by an integrated set of cash cropping and subsistence food cropping activities. In the Highlands provinces, the subsistence food crop sub-system is dominated by sweet potato production. Coffee dominates the cash cropping sub-system, but a limited number of food crops are also grown for cash sale. The dynamics between sub-systems can influence the scope for complementarity between, and technical efficiency of, their operations, especially in light of the seasonality of demand for household labour and management inputs within the farming system. A crucial element of these dynamic processes is diversification into commercial agricultural production, which can influence factor productivity and the efficiency of crop production where smallholders maintain a strong production base in subsistence foods. In this study we use survey data from households engaged in coffee and food crop production in the Benabena district of Eastern Highlands Province to derive technical efficiency indices for each household over two years. A stochastic input distance function approach is used to establish whether diversification economies exist and whether specialisation in coffee, subsistence food or cash food production significantly influences technical efficiency on the sampled smallholdings. Diversification economics are weakly evident between subsistence food production and both coffee and cash food production, but diseconomies of diversification are discerned between coffee and cash food production. A number of factors are tested for their effects on technical efficiency. Significant technical efficiency gains are made from diversification among broad cropping enterprises.
Keyword Agricultural Economics & Policy
Economics
Diversification Economies
Specialisation Efficiencies
Input Distance Function
Papua New Guinea
Smallholders
Technical Efficiency
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 13:37:28 EST