eHealth Literacy: Patient Engagement in Identifying Strategies to Encourage Use of Patient Portals Among Older Adults

Price-Haywood, Eboni G., Harden-Barrios, Jewel, Ulep, Robin and Luo, Qingyang (2017) eHealth Literacy: Patient Engagement in Identifying Strategies to Encourage Use of Patient Portals Among Older Adults. Population Health Management, 20 6: 486-494. doi:10.1089/pop.2016.0164


Author Price-Haywood, Eboni G.
Harden-Barrios, Jewel
Ulep, Robin
Luo, Qingyang
Title eHealth Literacy: Patient Engagement in Identifying Strategies to Encourage Use of Patient Portals Among Older Adults
Journal name Population Health Management   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1942-7891
1942-7905
Publication date 2017-04-06
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1089/pop.2016.0164
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 20
Issue 6
Start page 486
End page 494
Total pages 9
Place of publication New Rochelle, NY United States
Publisher Mary Ann Liebert
Language eng
Subject 2911 Leadership and Management
2719 Health Policy
2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
Abstract Innovations in chronic disease management are growing rapidly as advancements in technology broaden the scope of tools. Older adults are less likely to be willing or able to use patient portals or smartphone apps for health-related tasks. The authors conducted a cross-sectional survey of older adults (ages 50) with hypertension or diabetes to examine relationships between portal usage, interest in health-tracking tools, and eHealth literacy, and to solicit practical solutions to encourage technology adoption. Among 247 patients surveyed in a large integrated delivery health system between August 2015 and January 2016, eHealth literacy was positively associated with portal usage (OR [95% CI]: 1.3 [1.2-1.5]) and interest in health-tracking tools (1.2 [1.1-1.3]). Portal users compared to nonusers (N=137 vs.110) had higher rates of interest in using websites/smartphone apps to track blood pressure (55% vs. 36%), weight (53% vs. 35%), exercise (53% vs. 32%), or medication (46% vs 33%, all P<0.05). Portal users noted cumbersome processes for accessing portals and variations in provider availability for online scheduling and response times to messages. Portal nonusers expressed concerns about data security, lack of personalization, and limited perceived value of using portals. Both groups noted the importance of computer literacy and technical support. Patient stakeholders recommended marketing initiatives that capture patient stories demonstrating real-life applications of what patients can do with digital technology, how to use it, and why it may be useful. Health systems also must screen for eHealth literacy, provide training, promote proxy users, and institute quality assurance that ensures patients' experiences will not vary across the system.
Keyword Health Information
Online
Access
Experiences
Technology
Attitudes
Divide
Care
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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Created: Sat, 16 Dec 2017, 23:35:54 EST