Mental health education in occupational therapy professional preparation programs: Alignment between clinician priorities and coverage in university curricula

Scanlan, Justin Newton, Meredith, Pamela J., Haracz, Kirsti, Ennals, Priscilla, Pépin, Geneviève, Webster, Jayne S., Arblaster, Karen and Wright, Shelley (2017) Mental health education in occupational therapy professional preparation programs: Alignment between clinician priorities and coverage in university curricula. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 64 6: 436-447. doi:10.1111/1440-1630.12397


Author Scanlan, Justin Newton
Meredith, Pamela J.
Haracz, Kirsti
Ennals, Priscilla
Pépin, Geneviève
Webster, Jayne S.
Arblaster, Karen
Wright, Shelley
Title Mental health education in occupational therapy professional preparation programs: Alignment between clinician priorities and coverage in university curricula
Journal name Australian Occupational Therapy Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1440-1630
0045-0766
Publication date 2017-06-29
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1440-1630.12397
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 64
Issue 6
Start page 436
End page 447
Total pages 12
Place of publication Richmond, VIC Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Subject 3609 Occupational Therapy
Abstract Background/aim: Occupational therapy programs must prepare graduates for work in mental health. However, this area of practice is complex and rapidly changing. This study explored the alignment between educational priorities identified by occupational therapists practising in mental health and level of coverage of these topics in occupational therapy programs in Australia and New Zealand. Methods: Surveys were distributed to heads of all occupational therapy programs across Australia and New Zealand. The survey included educational priorities identified by occupational therapists in mental health from a previous study. Respondents were requested to identify the level of coverage given to each of these priorities within their curriculum. These data were analysed to determine a ranking of educational topics in terms of level of coverage in university programs. Results: Responses were received for 19 programs from 16 universities. Thirty-four topics were given ‘High-level coverage’ in university programs, and these were compared against the 29 topics classified as ‘Essential priorities’ by clinicians. Twenty topics were included in both the ‘Essential priorities’ and ‘High-level coverage’ categories. Topics considered to be ‘Essential priorities’ by clinicians which were not given ‘High-level coverage’ in university programs included the following: mental health fieldwork experiences; risk assessment and management; professional self-care resilience and sensory approaches. Conclusion: While there appears to be overall good alignment between mental health curricula and priorities identified by practising occupational therapists, there are some discrepancies. These discrepancies are described and establish a strong foundation for further discussion between clinicians, academics and university administration to support curriculum review and revision.
Keyword curriculum design
mental health
student education
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 16 Dec 2017, 20:03:35 EST