Detection of antibodies to secretions of ancylostoma caninum in human eosinophilic enteritis

Loukas, Alex, Croese, John, Opdebeeck, Joan and Prociv, Paul (1992) Detection of antibodies to secretions of ancylostoma caninum in human eosinophilic enteritis. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 86 6: 650-653. doi:10.1016/0035-9203(92)90175-C


Author Loukas, Alex
Croese, John
Opdebeeck, Joan
Prociv, Paul
Title Detection of antibodies to secretions of ancylostoma caninum in human eosinophilic enteritis
Journal name Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1878-3503
0035-9203
Publication date 1992-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/0035-9203(92)90175-C
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 86
Issue 6
Start page 650
End page 653
Total pages 4
Language eng
Subject 2405 Parasitology
2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
2725 Infectious Diseases
Abstract To evaluate the role of canine hookworms in human eosinophilic enteritis (EE) in north-eastern Australia, we tested human sera in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) which incorporated antigens of adult Ancylostoma caninum. Sera from the following groups were examined: 10 patients with EE (unexplained recurrent abdominal pain and related symptoms, with peripheral eosinophilia) from Townsville and Brisbane; 2 persons known to be infected with A. caninum and 20 presumed unexposed healthy controls; 20 patients with other gastrointestinal diseases; 20 with other identified parasitic infections; and 20 with atopic conditions. High levels of specific immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgE antibodies were found in patients with EE but not other gastrointestinal disease. Excretory-secretory (ES) products were more discriminating than somatic antigens in the elisa and the IgG/ES-elisa was the most specific; occasional cross-reactions could be explained on epidemiological or parasitological grounds. The IgM-ELISA was neither specific nor sensitive. We conclude that canine ancylostomiasis is a major cause of human EE in north-eastern Australia, and the pathogenesis is based probably on hypersensitivity to antigens secreted by the parasite.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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Created: Fri, 15 Dec 2017, 04:59:52 EST