The Effectiveness of Enhanced Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT-E): A Naturalistic Study within an Out-Patient Eating Disorder Service

Signorini, Rachel, Sheffield, Jeanie, Rhodes, Natalie, Fleming, Carmel and Ward, Warren (2017) The Effectiveness of Enhanced Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT-E): A Naturalistic Study within an Out-Patient Eating Disorder Service. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 46 1: 1-14. doi:10.1017/S1352465817000352


Author Signorini, Rachel
Sheffield, Jeanie
Rhodes, Natalie
Fleming, Carmel
Ward, Warren
Title The Effectiveness of Enhanced Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT-E): A Naturalistic Study within an Out-Patient Eating Disorder Service
Journal name Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1469-1833
1352-4658
Publication date 2017-06-19
Year available 2017
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S1352465817000352
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 46
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Subject 3203 Clinical Psychology
Abstract Background: The effectiveness of enhanced cognitive behavioural Therapy (CBT-E) for adults with a range of eating disorder presentations within routine clinical settings has been examined in only two known published studies, neither of which included a follow-up assessment period. Aim: The current study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of CBT-E within an out-patient eating disorder service in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, and incorporated a follow-up assessment period of approximately 20 weeks post-treatment. Method: The study involved 114 adult females with a diagnosed eating disorder, who attended an average of 20–40 individual CBT-E sessions with a psychologist or a psychiatry registrar between 2009 and 2013. Results: Of those who began treatment, 50% did not complete treatment, and the presence of psychosocial and environmental problems predicted drop-out. Amongst treatment completers, statistically and clinically significant improvements in eating disorder and general psychopathology were observed at post-treatment, which were generally maintained at the 20-week follow-up. Statistically significant improvements in eating disorder and general psychopathology were observed amongst the total sample. Conclusions: The findings, which were comparable to the previous Australian effectiveness study of CBT-E, indicate that CBT-E is an effective treatment for adults with all eating disorders within out-patient settings. Given the high attrition rate, however, minimizing drop-out appears to be an important consideration when implementing CBT-E within clinical settings.
Keyword cognitive behavioural therapy
Eating disorders
effectiveness
treatment
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 30 Nov 2017, 23:59:43 EST