Understanding the lived experiences of Parkinson's disease and deep brain stimulation (DBS) through occupational changes

Liddle, Jacki, Phillips, Jessie, Gustafsson, Louise and Silburn, Peter (2017) Understanding the lived experiences of Parkinson's disease and deep brain stimulation (DBS) through occupational changes. Australian occupational therapy journal, . doi:10.1111/1440-1630.12437


Author Liddle, Jacki
Phillips, Jessie
Gustafsson, Louise
Silburn, Peter
Title Understanding the lived experiences of Parkinson's disease and deep brain stimulation (DBS) through occupational changes
Journal name Australian occupational therapy journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1440-1630
Publication date 2017-11-22
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1440-1630.12437
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Abstract Deep brain stimulation (DBS), a surgically based treatment for people living with Parkinson's disease (PD), can result in a significant improvement of motor symptoms. However, the broader impact of DBS and the changes it creates are not well understood. Greater understanding of the experiences and needs related to DBS would enable development of relevant outcome measures and supports.

To explore the lived experiences of people undergoing DBS for Parkinson's disease.

A descriptive phenomenological study was undertaken exploring experiences, perspectives and outcomes with key stakeholders. Semi-structured, audiotaped interviews were undertaken with people with PD who have had DBS, their family members and health professionals across four states and territories in Australia.

Perspectives and experiences of 14 people with PD undergoing DBS, 10 family members and 11 health professionals were analysed. Occupations emerged as a key aspect throughout the DBS experience. Two major themes captured the role of occupation in relation to DBS: Occupations as a barometer, where occupational experiences and performances shaped people's understanding of their condition, the impact of treatments and their overall adjustment; and Shifting occupational identity where the life transition of DBS altered the occupational experiences of relationships, volition, roles and responsibilities of people with PD and their family members.

Occupational experiences and changes served as an important way for people with PD and their families to understand and communicate their experiences of PD and related treatments. There is an identified need for outcome measures and clinical education and interventions to reflect this.
Keyword adjustment
family
movement disorders
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Pubmed Import
 
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Created: Wed, 29 Nov 2017, 12:01:27 EST