Why do children and adolescents bully their peers? A critical review of key theoretical frameworks

Thomas, Hannah J., Connor, Jason P. and Scott, James G. (2017) Why do children and adolescents bully their peers? A critical review of key theoretical frameworks. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 1-15. doi:10.1007/s00127-017-1462-1


Author Thomas, Hannah J.
Connor, Jason P.
Scott, James G.
Title Why do children and adolescents bully their peers? A critical review of key theoretical frameworks
Journal name Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0933-7954
1433-9285
Publication date 2017-11-22
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1007/s00127-017-1462-1
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer Medizin
Language eng
Subject 2713 Epidemiology
3306 Health (social science)
3207 Social Psychology
2738 Psychiatry and Mental health
Abstract Bullying is a significant public health problem for children and adolescents worldwide. Evidence suggests that both being bullied (bullying victimisation) and bullying others (bullying perpetration) are associated with concurrent and future mental health problems. The onset and course of bullying perpetration are influenced by individual as well as systemic factors. Identifying effective solutions to address bullying requires a fundamental understanding of why it occurs. Drawing from multi-disciplinary domains, this review provides a summary and synthesis of the key theoretical frameworks applied to understanding and intervening on the issue of bullying. A number of explanatory models have been used to elucidate the dynamics of bullying, and broadly these correspond with either system (e.g., social-ecological, family systems, peer-group socialisation) or individual-level (e.g., developmental psychopathology, genetic, resource control, social-cognitive) frameworks. Each theory adds a unique perspective; however, no single framework comprehensively explains why bullying occurs. This review demonstrates that the integration of theoretical perspectives achieves a more nuanced understanding of bullying which is necessary for strengthening evidence-based interventions. Future progress requires researchers to integrate both the systems and individual-level theoretical frameworks to further improve current interventions. More effective intervention across different systems as well as tailoring interventions to the specific needs of the individuals directly involved in bullying will reduce exposure to a key risk factor for mental health problems.
Keyword Adolescents
Bullying
Children
Review
Theory
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID 1031909
1105807
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29167925?dopt=Abstract

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
HERDC Pre-Audit
Centre for Youth Substance Abuse Research Publications
Admin Only - UQCCR
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 27 Nov 2017, 14:10:16 EST by Hannah Jane Thomas on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research