Does uric acid level provide additional risk stratification information in emergency patients with symptoms of possible acute coronary syndrome?

Jin, Harry, Greenslade, Jaimi H., Parsonage, William A., Hawkins, Tracey, Than, Martin and Cullen, Louise (2016) Does uric acid level provide additional risk stratification information in emergency patients with symptoms of possible acute coronary syndrome?. Critical Pathways in Cardiology, 15 4: 169-173. doi:10.1097/HPC.0000000000000092


Author Jin, Harry
Greenslade, Jaimi H.
Parsonage, William A.
Hawkins, Tracey
Than, Martin
Cullen, Louise
Title Does uric acid level provide additional risk stratification information in emergency patients with symptoms of possible acute coronary syndrome?
Journal name Critical Pathways in Cardiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1535-2811
1535-282X
Publication date 2016-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/HPC.0000000000000092
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 15
Issue 4
Start page 169
End page 173
Total pages 5
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Abstract Elevated uric acid levels have been associated with the presence and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD). This study aimed to assess the clinical utility of serum uric acid levels to identify patients at high risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in those who presented to the emergency department (ED) with chest pain.

This was a prospective observational study of 951 adult patients who were being evaluated for ACS in a single ED. Serum uric acid was taken on presentation. Patients were followed up 30 days and 1 year after initial presentation. The primary outcome was a diagnosis of ACS within 30 days of initial attendance. A logistic regression analysis was performed to identify whether elevated uric acid levels were predictive of ACS. Kaplan-Meier curves were generated to identify 1-year mortality in those who were available for 1-year follow-up and Cox regression was performed to identify whether uric acid levels were an independent predictor of mortality.

ACS was diagnosed in 88 patients and 140 patients had elevated uric acid levels. A total of 679 patients agreed to 1-year follow-up. Elevated uric acid levels were not associated with a diagnosis of ACS (p = 0.96). Patients with elevated uric acid had a higher 1-year death rate (8/101; 7.92%) compared with patients with normal uric acid levels (12/596; 2.01%, p < 0.01).

Uric acid levels lack diagnostic utility for ACS but may be useful for identifying ED patients with chest pain who are at high risk for 1-year mortality. Elevated uric acid levels correlate with the presence of other risk factors of CAD and are a marker for poor long-term outcome.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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Created: Wed, 15 Nov 2017, 12:49:43 EST