Panic Disorder in Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department With Chest Pain: Prevalence and Presenting Symptoms.

Greenslade, Jaimi H., Hawkins, Tracey, Parsonage, William and Cullen, Louise (2017) Panic Disorder in Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department With Chest Pain: Prevalence and Presenting Symptoms.. Heart, lung & circulation, 26 12: 1310-1316. doi:10.1016/j.hlc.2017.01.001


Author Greenslade, Jaimi H.
Hawkins, Tracey
Parsonage, William
Cullen, Louise
Title Panic Disorder in Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department With Chest Pain: Prevalence and Presenting Symptoms.
Journal name Heart, lung & circulation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1444-2892
Publication date 2017-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.hlc.2017.01.001
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 26
Issue 12
Start page 1310
End page 1316
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier Ltd
Language eng
Subject 2740 Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
2705 Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
Abstract Patients with panic disorder experience symptoms such as palpitations, chest pain, dizziness, and breathlessness. Consequently, they may attend the Emergency Department (ED) to be assessed for possible emergency medical conditions. Recognition of panic disorder within the ED is low. We sought to establish the prevalence of panic disorder in patients presenting for ED investigation of potential acute coronary syndrome. We also sought to characterise the cohort of patients with panic disorder in terms of presenting symptoms, risk factors, medical history and major adverse cardiac events (MACE).

This was an observational study of 338 adult patients presenting to the Emergency Department of a tertiary hospital in Australia. Research nurses collected clinical data using a customised case report form. The outcome was panic disorder, assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview.

The average age of participants was 50.2 years and 37.9% were female. Thirty-day MACE occurred in 7.7% of the cohort. The clinical diagnosis of panic disorder was made in 5.6% (95% CI: 3.4-8.6%) of patients. Compared to patients without panic disorder, patients with panic disorder were slightly more likely to report that their pain felt heavy (48.9% and 73.7% respectively, p=0.04). All other reported symptoms were similar in the two groups.

The prevalence of panic disorder was low in patients presenting to an Australian ED with chest pain. Clinical signs or symptoms that are routinely collected as part of the chest pain workup cannot be used to distinguish patients with and without panic disorder.
Keyword Acute coronary syndrome
Emergency medicine
Panic disorder
Prevalence
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID QEMRF-PROG-2010-004
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Pubmed Import
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 15 Nov 2017, 12:42:25 EST